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Screwfix Drill/Impact Driver Twin Pack Bargains - DeWalt vs Makita


carbs for arbs
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Wish I'd seen this thread on Monday! I'm using my employer's DeWalt set at work a lot at the moment, I've not a bad word to say about them, and I'm going to buy my own right now. Great tools.

 

I'm lying, I have two bad words to say:

I've had the chuck on the drill stick once, but a quick tap with something solid unstuck it.

The impact driver tends to heat up pretty quickly if you are using it non-stop, which can be a hassle if that's what you need to do. Best solution I've found is to go and do something else for a while...

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Serious improvement, looks much better than before. Did you keep track of how many hours it took? 

 

Thank you. Our house and where the cheapest quote came in at £60 k at £84 a square metre. Total DIY cost excluding labour was for 9 tonnes of sand, three of cement and three impact hammer drills @ £130 each plus sundries such as plasticiser, SDS chisels, etc.

184 hours for that west side you have pictured, but that included replacing a window over lintel and other building work, that would’ve been in addition to the professional quotes. IMG_6487.thumb.jpg.669d22977713028dd7c9d4180e54c075.jpgThe other side took less time but also included replacing 2 lintels and some crappy infill of brick around services that the harl concealed.

I also have an old wanked out cherry picker that saved on the 2k erection of scaffolding and weekly rental of it that the professionals required.

 

 

 

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If you are buying the top end models and 18 or 12v, Milwaukee currently piss all over dewalt and makita- and I say that as a former makita devotee. 
 

Never buy any power tools from screwfix. They are always cheaper elsewhere, and as mentioned the specs aren’t great either. 

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Wish I'd seen this thread on Monday! I'm using my employer's DeWalt set at work a lot at the moment, I've not a bad word to say about them, and I'm going to buy my own right now. Great tools.
 
I'm lying, I have two bad words to say:
I've had the chuck on the drill stick once, but a quick tap with something solid unstuck it.
The impact driver tends to heat up pretty quickly if you are using it non-stop, which can be a hassle if that's what you need to do. Best solution I've found is to go and do something else for a while...

I recently bought a Dewalt 3/8 impact driver set that came with two batteries. A fantastic bit of kit for removing engine/ smaller suspension components in restricted spaces.
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33 minutes ago, Baldbloke said:

 

Thank you. Our house and where the cheapest quote came in at £60 k at £84 a square metre. Total DIY cost excluding labour was for 9 tonnes of sand, three of cement and three impact hammer drills @ £130 each plus sundries such as plasticiser, SDS chisels, etc.

184 hours for that west side you have pictured, but that included replacing a window over lintel and other building work, that would’ve been in addition to the professional quotes. IMG_6487.thumb.jpg.669d22977713028dd7c9d4180e54c075.jpgThe other side took less time but also included replacing 2 lintels and some crappy infill of brick around services that the harl concealed.

I also have an old wanked out cherry picker that saved on the 2k erection of scaffolding and weekly rental of it that the professionals required.

 

 

 

Not lime mortar, on a house that looks pretty aged?

 

Neat job, looks a pain to do!

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52 minutes ago, sandspider said:

Not lime mortar, on a house that looks pretty aged?

 

Neat job, looks a pain to do!

I was thinking that. Looks like that stone has already suffered the effects of being pointed with cement in the past!

 

9 tonnes of sand and 3 of cement is a hellishly strong mix too!!

Edited by doobin
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On 13/10/2021 at 15:12, carbs for arbs said:

I agree - looks great (as does your dog Conor).  Huge area so must have taken quite some time.  Did you repoint with lime?  

 

23 minutes ago, doobin said:

I was thinking that. 

 

Likewise.

 

We've got a section of our house with concrete render / roughcast which we'll be removing next year. We'll then leave the stonework exposed and repoint in lime.

 

Unfortunately though, there's another section of the house that is already exposed stone, but was pointed with standard mortar. Seems the verdict is that removing the current pointing would cause too much damage, so we're stuck with it as is. 

 

Bit off a thread derail, but hey - it's all interesting and good stuff!

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1 hour ago, doobin said:

Never buy any power tools from screwfix. They are always cheaper elsewhere, and as mentioned the specs aren’t great either. 

 

That's interesting. I always thought they were the same as told available elsewhere but with a slight tweak to the model number so they could claim it's an "exclusive". That seems to be the game played with other goods. For example, many exclusive home appliances at places like AO are the same item but under a different name or number.

 

Which specs aren't great on those models? And where have you seen them cheaper?

 

Cheers

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25 minutes ago, carbs for arbs said:

 

That's interesting. I always thought they were the same as told available elsewhere but with a slight tweak to the model number so they could claim it's an "exclusive". That seems to be the game played with other goods. For example, many exclusive home appliances at places like AO are the same item but under a different name or number.

 

Which specs aren't great on those models? And where have you seen them cheaper?

 

Cheers

I've always found that any power tool specialist mail order place such as powertoolsuk or SGS will be cheaper than Screwfix for the same spec tools. A screwfix model might be brushless, but it will be bottom of the range brushless, for example.

 

Ebay is usually the place to find the cheapest price, but research the specs and search by the model number rather than assuming that a brushless Makita drill from Screwfix will be the same as any brushless Makita drill. They must have have a dozen brushless models.

 

Personally I just buy the top of the range of whatever I need, bare. Then use Chinese batteries- but only a 'good' chinese brand such as Waitely.

 

Example- BHP481Z. Looks like a top spec Makita brushless drill, bare version £189.99 at Screwfix

 

https://www.screwfix.com/p/makita-dhp481z-18v-li-ion-lxt-brushless-cordless-combi-drill-bare/2486j

 

But only £140 on eBay from a dealer.

 

WWW.EBAY.CO.UK

If you regularly do a lot of drilling, it's worth investing in a tool that you can truly rely on: Makita's DHP481Z. For all its...

 

Yet it's a pretty old model, the top of the range currently is the 486z, bare version is only £147.90 on ebay.

So yeah, don't buy powertools from Screwfix or Toolstation!

Edited by doobin
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