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john87

Faulty blade bolts...

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Not quite armfuls but certainly not a stem at a time; fistfuls...

 

But do try to avoid feeding large amounts of the leaf without some stems too; they're fibrous so can wrap but it's no biggie - I've chipped Phormium (New Zealand Flax) without issue

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1 hour ago, john87 said:

The bamboo is about 1/2" diameter i suppose. You have a job to cut it with a machete.. Hopefully my brushcutter with a steel blade will do it though. [I hope] This blade here i have..

 

 

Do you feed the bamboo in a bit at a time or just chuck armfulls in??

 

john..

oregon.jpg

That is a grass blade really. I don't think it will work for anything woody. You'll need a clearing saw blade, or at least a scratcher tooth blade.

Edited by tree_beard

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10 minutes ago, tree_beard said:

That is a grass blade really. I don't think it will work for anything woody. You'll need a clearing saw blade, or at least a scratched tooth blade.

Could you recommend one you think would be better?? I would not know where to start with selecting one..

 

john..

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Depends on your make and size of brush cutter... Pop "clearing saw blade" or "scratcher tooth brush cutter blade" into your search engine of choice and youll find plenty of links to suitable products and suppliers.

 

Chainsaw or decent capacity hedgecutter are also an option for bamboo. Mini digger and a box of matches is my preference

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9 hours ago, tree_beard said:

Depends on your make and size of brush cutter... Pop "clearing saw blade" or "scratcher tooth brush cutter blade" into your search engine of choice and youll find plenty of links to suitable products and suppliers.

 

Chainsaw or decent capacity hedgecutter are also an option for bamboo. Mini digger and a box of matches is my preference

If you are truly trying to get rid of the bamboo, then the last option above is the best route, and you might need a bit more than a mini digger. Been there, done that. ( Opposite Hook Heath Golf Club, about half acre of it, some clumps about five feet across).

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7 minutes ago, Deafhead said:

If you are truly trying to get rid of the bamboo, then the last option above is the best route, and you might need a bit more than a mini digger. Been there, done that. ( Opposite Hook Heath Golf Club, about half acre of it, some clumps about five feet across).

I would go the digger route too, [I own one] but there is no access.. Good news is that the stuff has not spread everywhere, it is just like a 12 foot diameter clump. I cannot burn it where it is either as the surrounding buildings are stuffed with smoke alarms in the roof spaces too. One whiff and the fire brigade will be around!!

 

john..

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12.9  is the grade of bolt  strongest but maybe be more brittle so maybe not the best choice?

 

Has the info being removed from top of second bolt

i wonder?

 

https://www.boltscience.com/pages/the-stronger-the-better-is-not-necessarily-the-case-for-fasteners.pdf

Quote

It is also common for the blame to be attached to some
fault in the manufacturing process rather than the service
environment in which the fastener is placed. Rather than a
manufacturing flaw it could be due to the choice of the type
of fastener, coupled with the service environment in which
the fastener is placed, that is the root cause of the failure. This
is not widely recognised.
Many fastener users, crudely put, think that ‘stronger is
better’. The thinking is that structural failure can be catastrophic
not only in terms of material/replacement costs but also the
indirect costs related to the loss of company reputation. By
using a higher strength fastener, the assumption is that the
risk of such a failure occurring will be reduced. But in regard to
fasteners, given the adverse effect that hydrogen can have on
high strength fasteners, stronger is often certainly not better.
With fasteners, brittle type failures can be especially
troublesome since they can occur unexpectedly giving no warning.
The most common type of brittle fracture in fasteners is due to
the poisonous effects that hydrogen can have on the strength of
some steels. The deleterious effect that hydrogen can have on
steel was first reported in a paper to the Royal Society in 1875
by W. H. Johnson. Since that time the topic has been studied
extensively but is still the subject of research and controversy.
Hydrogen induced cracking, commonly referred to as
hydrogen embrittlement, can occur to high strength steels
and certain other metals such as titanium and certain
stainless steels. Atomic hydrogen can enter the material
during the production process or during its service life (as a
result of corrosion or hydrogen in the atmosphere) causing a
catastrophic brittle fracture. This occurs at a stress level well
below the yield strength of the fastener.

5.JPG

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12.9 is a stronger bolt over a 8.8 my old boss had a winch that alway broke 8.8 bolts, suppler chucked him some 12.9 bolts and said try them never had to change one that broke again. Just on a safety thing when pulling large trees. 

As for bolts holding blades they only hold them back to plate, seat blade sits on is were the main strength is. 

 

Edited by woody paul

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