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Having The Dogs Balls Removed

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Just now, peds said:

Either, both. The rules are the same. I'd have thought that was implied, depending on whether you have a dog or bitch. 

Most people seem to think it should always be the dog that gets done mine have always been working dogs so by the time you know if there suitable for puppies it's a bit late really!

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7 minutes ago, billy_wizz said:

Most properly trained dogs are not a problem whether neutered or not it's just that most people either don't know how or don't want to spend the time to do it properly!

It's a fair point, but neutering does make the goal easier to attain. It's more of an issue for unneutered male dogs I feel, but then I would only have a female dog anyway.

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1 minute ago, Big J said:

It's a fair point, but neutering does make the goal easier to attain. It's more of an issue for unneutered male dogs I feel, but then I would only have a female dog anyway.

To be fair I've never had any problems with my dogs but I generally do my best to avoid other people as round by me there seem to be more idiots with uncontrolled dogs than people who have a clue! Also there the type that pikeys liked to relieve people of even before dog napping got out of hand

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1 hour ago, billy_wizz said:

To be fair I've never had any problems with my dogs but I generally do my best to avoid other people as round by me there seem to be more idiots with uncontrolled dogs than people who have a clue! Also there the type that pikeys liked to relieve people of even before dog napping got out of hand

I'm not generally concerned about people with dogs off the lead. It's the ones that are on leads that worry me more.

 

Last summer a lady walked up from the town to grab some aquarium plants from me with her dog (we're 500m outside the town on a country lane - you see loads of dog walkers). She was keeping her distance explained that her dog (staffie) was really bad with other dogs. It was on a harness and muzzled, but it somehow got off. It went through my three year old, knocking her over to get to my dog, which it pinned to the floor. It would have mauled her had it not had a muzzle on. I grabbed it by the harness and lifted it off my dog and the lady made many apologies and left. 

 

In my view, there is no possible justification for an animal like that to not be euthanised. It's a serious risk to the public, should it manage to escape it's owner. I honestly have no idea why anyone would want to take a dog like that on, but I have an acquaintance who always takes on rescue boxers with serious behavioural issues. 

 

We're far too soft in the UK sometimes. If a dog can't function adequately as a dog, it serves no purpose. People scream bloody murder that it's unfair because it's not the dog's fault it's like that, but they forget that their nutbar pooch will negatively, and permanently affect the behaviour of previously well balanced dogs. Put the high risk dogs down, train the owners and break the cycle.

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55 minutes ago, Big J said:

I'm not generally concerned about people with dogs off the lead. It's the ones that are on leads that worry me more.

 

Last summer a lady walked up from the town to grab some aquarium plants from me with her dog (we're 500m outside the town on a country lane - you see loads of dog walkers). She was keeping her distance explained that her dog (staffie) was really bad with other dogs. It was on a harness and muzzled, but it somehow got off. It went through my three year old, knocking her over to get to my dog, which it pinned to the floor. It would have mauled her had it not had a muzzle on. I grabbed it by the harness and lifted it off my dog and the lady made many apologies and left. 

 

In my view, there is no possible justification for an animal like that to not be euthanised. It's a serious risk to the public, should it manage to escape it's owner. I honestly have no idea why anyone would want to take a dog like that on, but I have an acquaintance who always takes on rescue boxers with serious behavioural issues. 

 

We're far too soft in the UK sometimes. If a dog can't function adequately as a dog, it serves no purpose. People scream bloody murder that it's unfair because it's not the dog's fault it's like that, but they forget that their nutbar pooch will negatively, and permanently affect the behaviour of previously well balanced dogs. Put the high risk dogs down, train the owners and break the cycle.

So, I have a rescue working terrier who, as well as being a pet performs an invaluable task keeping rat numbers down & grabbing the occasional rabbit from the veg garden. She is however a nightmare with dogs she does not know  and will attack on sight - should I kill her?
I also have a 50 plus kg GSD x malamute dog, complete and 11 years old. He was attacked by 2 farm collies as a young dog and he had to fight and nearly killed both of them.As a result is not to be trusted around other unknown dogs, as he is fearful of attack so can be aggressive if approached. He can not be let off a lead as a result- should I take him to the vets and have him euthanised?
Your very myopic in your attitude I think - Perhaps the companionship of that dog is all that keeps that woman from suicide? Perhaps it was a collie that attacked it as a puppy and it never forgot? I have met more bad people than bad dogs I can assure you.

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14 hours ago, Pete Mctree said:

I think that the vets are out of step with current evidence - remember sick pets are there business.

Very much with you there, and to me this carries over into human medicine driven by pharma's corrupt greed.

 

I'm not anti vet and in fact I have a very conscientious and open minded one, but I think it's worth researching any problem that your hairy companion has in order to keep yourself up to date with current thinking and enabling you to have an educated conversation with your vet if treatment is needed... 

 

There's no doubt that at the right time removing a dogs sexual urges whether male or female makes them a lot more stable and reliable about the home, cheers.

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12 hours ago, Pete Mctree said:

So, I have a rescue working terrier who, as well as being a pet performs an invaluable task keeping rat numbers down & grabbing the occasional rabbit from the veg garden. She is however a nightmare with dogs she does not know  and will attack on sight - should I kill her?
I also have a 50 plus kg GSD x malamute dog, complete and 11 years old. He was attacked by 2 farm collies as a young dog and he had to fight and nearly killed both of them.As a result is not to be trusted around other unknown dogs, as he is fearful of attack so can be aggressive if approached. He can not be let off a lead as a result- should I take him to the vets and have him euthanised?
Your very myopic in your attitude I think - Perhaps the companionship of that dog is all that keeps that woman from suicide? Perhaps it was a collie that attacked it as a puppy and it never forgot? I have met more bad people than bad dogs I can assure you.

To answer both your questions, yes to both, probably. 

 

Your terrier is a risk to other dogs and is likely to cause the kind of situation that your second dog finds itself in. Excessively aggressive dogs aren't necessarily in that condition through any fault of their own, but they nevertheless find themselves in that situation and serve to continue the problem by psychologically scarring other dogs. I just don't see the point in having a dog that is a liability. Whether that's because it's got crap recall or because it's aggressive. It's not a particularly large leap for a dog to start attacking people (children in particular) if they routinely attack dogs.

 

There shouldn't be any kind of misplaced sense of altruism when it comes to rehoming damaged dogs. In all likelihood, they make the lives of the owners more difficult going forward and they will possibly cause emotional distress (or physical injuries) to other dogs/animals/people. Why take the risk? You're stuck with a dog for potentially 15 years or more, and that's a long time if it's a nutbar. 

 

My enjoyment of having a dog is watching her have a full and complete life. Knowing that I can take her anywhere, into any situation (except for perhaps going to a cat sanctuary - she's rather scared of cats 😄 ) without having to worry about her. It's fascinating watching her develop her own relationships with people too. I worked a busy National Trust site in February and she got to know a local dog walker (and the 15 odd dogs she walked regularly) and that she had dog treats. Me, sat in the cab of my forwarder, watching her fleece a soppy lady for treats whilst cuddling up to her was lovely because I trust her completely to be able to do that independently of me. The dog walker was only too happy too. 

 

The idea of having to restrain a dog on a lead for 100% of the time we're out is awful to me. I just don't see the point. It's a chore, not a pleasure. 

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23 hours ago, Big J said:

I'm not generally concerned about people with dogs off the lead. It's the ones that are on leads that worry me more.

 

Last summer a lady walked up from the town to grab some aquarium plants from me with her dog (we're 500m outside the town on a country lane - you see loads of dog walkers). She was keeping her distance explained that her dog (staffie) was really bad with other dogs. It was on a harness and muzzled, but it somehow got off. It went through my three year old, knocking her over to get to my dog, which it pinned to the floor. It would have mauled her had it not had a muzzle on. I grabbed it by the harness and lifted it off my dog and the lady made many apologies and left. 

 

In my view, there is no possible justification for an animal like that to not be euthanised. It's a serious risk to the public, should it manage to escape it's owner. I honestly have no idea why anyone would want to take a dog like that on, but I have an acquaintance who always takes on rescue boxers with serious behavioural issues. 

 

We're far too soft in the UK sometimes. If a dog can't function adequately as a dog, it serves no purpose. People scream bloody murder that it's unfair because it's not the dog's fault it's like that, but they forget that their nutbar pooch will negatively, and permanently affect the behaviour of previously well balanced dogs. Put the high risk dogs down, train the owners and break the cycle.

Jonathan . I have had 9 spaniels in my time . All working cockers and one Sprocker ( in my avatar )  He was the best dog for me out of them all but he could not slot himself into the right position in the family pecking order . He had all his tackle . Out and about he was spot on . Worked like a loony but never far from me . Pretty much ignored other dogs when out . . He was aggressive to my daughter . I got my daughter to feed him , take him out , and generally bond with her . He had attacked her a couple of times and to her credit she agreed to do as I asked . It was no good mate . I came home one after noon and he had bitten my daughter and my wife . I took him out and ran him around the woods for a couple of hours to see if he was in any pain . He was perfect physically . Took him to the vets and said good by . Broke my heart but it was the only solution . 

Edited by Stubby
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6 minutes ago, Stubby said:

Jonathan . I have had 9 spaniels in my time . All working cockers and one Sprocker ( in my avatar )  He was the best dog for me out of them all but he could not slot himself into the right position in the family pecking order . He had all his tackle . Out and about he was spot on . Worked like a loony but never far from me . Pretty much ignored other dogs when out . . He was aggressive to my daughter . I got my daughter to feed him , take him out , and generally bond with her . He had attacked her a couple of times and to her credit she agreed to do as I asked . It was no good mate . I came home one after noon and he had bitten my daughter and my wife . I took him out and ran him around the woods for a couple of hours to see if he was in any pain . He was perfect physically . Took him to the vets and said good by . Broke my heart but it was the only solution . 

 

I'm sorry that you found yourself in that situation. It must have been awful, even if it was a clear choice that needed to be made.

 

With my dog, she never forgets anything and responds badly even with relatively mild aggression. We've very good friends an hour from us, who have a labrador who is (as they put it), just a bit of an arsehole with other dogs. Katie is one of two dogs he gets on with, but he always has one aggressive bark at her every time we see them. After that, he's fine and they largely ignore each other. 

 

When we visited them on Easter Sunday, I had to physically lift Katie out the boot because she didn't want to get out on account of their lab. She was totally fine throughout, but she's fearful of aggressive dogs, and rightly so. And he's really not that bad - he just doesn't know how to play and is aggressive instead (though not physically). 

 

What's difficult for them now is that my friend can't walk the dog and her daughter (who is 2yrs 3 month) at the same time. She needs both hands to restrain the dog but obviously can't let go of her daughter. So it causes them a lot of stress. They've really tried correcting his behaviour and he's great with kids and bigger people too. He's just a liability with other dogs. 

 

I couldn't live like that, if I'm honest. The world has way too many dogs and people shouldn't feel that by rescuing a dog they are doing anyone a favour. From a utilitarian standpoint, the greatest kindness is to euthanise almost any unwanted dog as they'll eat many, many more animals during the remainder of their life. But having a dog (or indeed any pet) is almost always a completely selfish, and completely natural decision. I just can't understand why some people burden themselves intentionally with damaged pets. 

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3 hours ago, Stubby said:

Jonathan . I have had 9 spaniels in my time . All working cockers and one Sprocker ( in my avatar )  He was the best dog for me out of them all but he could not slot himself into the right position in the family pecking order . He had all his tackle . Out and about he was spot on . Worked like a loony but never far from me . Pretty much ignored other dogs when out . . He was aggressive to my daughter . I got my daughter to feed him , take him out , and generally bond with her . He had attacked her a couple of times and to her credit she agreed to do as I asked . It was no good mate . I came home one after noon and he had bitten my daughter and my wife . I took him out and ran him around the woods for a couple of hours to see if he was in any pain . He was perfect physically . Took him to the vets and said good by . Broke my heart but it was the only solution . 

 

That's heart wretching .. really is! 

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