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Ontario Firewood Resource

Pine as firewood...yes or no?

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On 09/04/2021 at 03:31, Gav73 said:

 


Softwood is viewed as outdoor fire pit wood or kindling in the US and Canada?

I get the kindling bit, but why use softwood on a fire pit? It smokes more and spits - both things you don’t want on an open fire

I don't know, that's just how it is here. Actually I think its because its a lot colder here than where you are, but whether there is hardwood high availability or not, hardwood is preserved for heat I guess. When it is -10C and colder, it makes a difference what you're burning

Edited by Ontario Firewood Resource

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If I've got any yew wood I set that aside for very cold weather. Burns fairly quickly but produces incredible heat. Ideal for an instant hit of warmth. 

 

Right now I'm living at my late mother's house which I'm in the process of selling. To avoid getting tied onto a contract with the electricity supplier I'm on a monthly standard rate tariff which is expensive, so I'm using the Rayburn for all my hot water and cooking. I've got a stash of yew wood and loads of old hawthorn chunks and with the right mix of species you can really fine tune heat control. and turn it up or down remarkably quickly. And my electricity bill is about £25 a month...

 

When it sells I'm looking to buy a plot and build my own place and I'm definitely going as off-grid as possible. 

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I don't know, that's just how it is here. Actually I think its because its a lot colder here than where you are, but whether there is hardwood high availability or not, hardwood is preserved for heat I guess. When it is -10C and colder, it makes a difference what you're burning


Or is the idea to use softwood outside to have lots of sparks and smoke to keep the bears at bay?

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8 hours ago, Gimlet said:

If I've got any yew wood I set that aside for very cold weather. Burns fairly quickly but produces incredible heat. Ideal for an instant hit of warmth. 

 

Right now I'm living at my late mother's house which I'm in the process of selling. To avoid getting tied onto a contract with the electricity supplier I'm on a monthly standard rate tariff which is expensive, so I'm using the Rayburn for all my hot water and cooking. I've got a stash of yew wood and loads of old hawthorn chunks and with the right mix of species you can really fine tune heat control. and turn it up or down remarkably quickly. And my electricity bill is about £25 a month...

 

When it sells I'm looking to buy a plot and build my own place and I'm definitely going as off-grid as possible. 

Good call, energy is only going up in price in the future. Unfortunately the Watermelons (green commies) will want to cut us of from using the precious trees because they think wind and solar will save the world

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Reducing the human population to one tenth of its present level and keeping it there forever will save the world. All else is grass. 

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51 minutes ago, Gimlet said:

Reducing the human population to one tenth of its present level and keeping it there forever will save the world. All else is grass. 

1/10th? Those are rookie numbers! You gotta pump those numbers up. :D 

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10 hours ago, Gimlet said:

Reducing the human population to one tenth of its present level and keeping it there forever will save the world. All else is grass. 

A tenth seems a bit OTT, I think with correct use of the earths genuinely renewable resources we could probably sustain a bit more than that but being such a taboo subject it's never examined properly to be more precise.

 

However, I've no doubt that you are entirely correct in referring to it as where the true solution lays.

 

 

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Please please PLEASE stop spreading dangerous rumours that leylandii is good to burn!  It'll make it much harder for me to get good firewood. ;)

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2 hours ago, neiln said:

Please please PLEASE stop spreading dangerous rumours that leylandii is good to burn!  It'll make it much harder for me to get good firewood. ;)

It's highly dangerous. Very flammable.

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