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Ste2021

Should I stay or should I go?

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Hi I have a 25 year old sycamore tree in my garden which predates a nearby conservatory (about 20 feet away, built 15 years ago). There has been some movement in the conservatory brickwork in recent years which may be caused by the roots, I have attached a mechanism which details little or no movement over the last 6 months so it may have settled. The dilemma I now have is whether I should (A) remove the tree or (B) keep it. I have invited tree sugeons and builders to give advice and estimates for works but they seem to steer in the direction that best suits their pocket. The tree does need pruning and I am inclined to do that and patch up the brickwork/continue to monitor but there seems to be some risk either way. Any advice gratefully received!

Tree.jpg

Conservatory.jpg

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There doesn't look like there is a DPC.



It’s cracked along dpc course, put on your glasses eggs and look again
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2 minutes ago, Mull said:

 

 


It’s cracked along dpc course, put on your glasses eggs and look againemoji846.png

 

 

You are indeed correct, yes I had put my glasses on to see it.

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As the course below dpc and course above dpc are not attached the crack you show in pic could have nothing whatsoever to do with the tree, in fact, for what it’s worth, I’d say it’s fairly unlikely.

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Almost brick for brick like my sisters  house. Certainly  dont start blaming tree until you got more evidence or it could make bad  - worse. Whats happening next door? They any problems? K

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Looks like simple freeze thaw weathering to me on the dpc joint, can’t see any vertical cracks in your pics which is what i’d expect to see with “movement” or “intrusion”

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Also Acer, Norway maple was originally variegated and has now mainly reverted, does not affect foundations other than variegated normally less vigorous.

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