Jump to content
Nykib

Beech trees

Recommended Posts

You reckon those are ordinary purple beech pollarded or fastigiate ones?

 

(dawyck purple)

Edited by Mick Dempsey

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Steve Bullman said:

Perhaps speak to the tree officer about the possibilty of managing them bi-annually, This could be done with hedgecutters, essentially creating a coupe of nicely manicured lollipop trees. I think it would probably be better for the trees than cutting them hard back every 5-10 years or so, and would create quite a nice feature in your front garden.

I agree

2 hours ago, woody paul said:

As long as they are re-pollarded back to truck and not half do like you see most of the time and they call it pollard. 

Lovely trees, I cut a beech back hard about 6 years ago now and trim re growth back by thinning every couple of years. 

My worry with that approach is that the branches are over mature and there may not be adventitious shoots  to form  new growth.  Once beech gets into middle age it doesn't coppice well, not sure about pollarding.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You will. Need to apply to the council tree officer for any works of this nature. Not a issue, you can do it your self or most reputable tree surgeons will do the paperwork on your behalf.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If they have TPO I would of thought re-pollarded would not be aloud, so thin and shape best options but also carried out at the right time of the year is another critical fact to keeping them in good health. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 22/02/2021 at 09:21, Nykib said:

Hi I’m looking for some help regarding two tree in my front garden , firstly I would just like to say I love the trees and would not want to remove them . 
I have recently received a letter off the council putting tree protection orders on the trees which makes me feel very anxious (should I be)

The trees have apparently been cut down at some stage during their lifetime and have very thick trunks which makes the crown of the trees quite low and blocks out the sun to my house , my concern is that I won’t be able to thin the crowns of the trees when I feel is necessary with the T.P.O is here anyone that could advise me on objecting to this order or do you think it’s not necessary, thanks in advance I will try an upload some photos of there current appearance and one from 2018 which shows the trees in full leaf

49C24AB6-AD7B-486C-9846-6E54E88C343B.png

84B0787B-572A-44C1-943C-9AF2D1306DFA.jpeg

5D919B41-DD72-41B1-95E9-FC3E828F80EB.jpeg

What is the reason for the TPO?

 

Has there recently been a planning application nearby?  Why would the LA ‘suddenly’ feel the need for a TPO on such previously relatively long standing trees?

 

Pics seem to indicate mature trees, previously pollarded/topped, elevated position immediately adjacent to highway. 
 

A TPO at this stage might usually be as a consequence of a perceived ‘threat’ to tree retention or a consequence of somebody at Parish or LA level getting all excited about trees and attempting to initiate mass TPOs. 
 

Future tree management isn’t barred by a TPO but the reason, nature and extent of proposed work needs to be approved by LA. This can often be perceived as intrusive and burdensome depending on the TO’s personal approach to such matters. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/03/2021 at 16:04, kevinjohnsonmbe said:

What is the reason for the TPO?

 

Has there recently been a planning application nearby?  Why would the LA ‘suddenly’ feel the need for a TPO on such previously relatively long standing trees?

 

Pics seem to indicate mature trees, previously pollarded/topped, elevated position immediately adjacent to highway. 
 

A TPO at this stage might usually be as a consequence of a perceived ‘threat’ to tree retention or a consequence of somebody at Parish or LA level getting all excited about trees and attempting to initiate mass TPOs. 
 

Future tree management isn’t barred by a TPO but the reason, nature and extent of proposed work needs to be approved by LA. This can often be perceived as intrusive and burdensome depending on the TO’s personal approach to such matters. 

Closest thing to someone answering the original question.

 

Succesful objection to a TPO would only be ion legal (procedural) grounds. Hardly worth objecting most times.

 

TPO doesn't mean you can't fdo anything, just means you need to ask first and give a good reason for it, generally showing that the amentiy that the trees provide will not be lost.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Featured Adverts

  • Tip site reviews

About

Arbtalk.co.uk is a hub for the arboriculture industry in the UK.  
If you're just starting out and you need business, equipment, tech or training support you're in the right place.  If you've done it, made it, got a van load of oily t-shirts and have decided to give something back by sharing your knowledge or wisdom,  then you're welcome too.
If you would like to contribute to making this industry more effective and safe then welcome.
Just like a living tree, it'll always be a work in progress.
Please have a look around, sign up, share and contribute the best you have.

See you inside.

The Arbtalk Team

Follow us

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.