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Billhook

Dutch Elm Fungus appearing on Log?

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Looking at some mixed firewood logs today, I noticed that just the Elm logs have a greeny / blue ring of either fungus or lichen.  Since the tree died with Dutch Elm disease, is this the fungus coming out that the beetle introduced?

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1 hour ago, Rough Hewn said:

Got blue mold on most of my stock.
Mainly on the acers.
Doubt it’s DED.

Me too it's just mould forming on wood that is still moist. The log looks more like oak to me but you can often make out the dark parts of a circle where the tyloses have formed in the sapwood of infected elm. AFAIK the fungus (whose name has changed again but ?? ulmi) is single celled yeast like so probably has no obvious fruiting body.

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Got exactly the same on the cut face of some of the softwood stacks near me . Larch and N/spruce .

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its just mould and it will generally start on the outer sap wood, Scotts pine i find is about the worst and it will start to show in a couple of days after felling, Larch is another one thats bad for it, a mate of mine milled some Larch cladding and 24 hrs later was showing the blue mould,

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On 05/01/2021 at 13:55, openspaceman said:

Me too it's just mould forming on wood that is still moist. The log looks more like oak to me but you can often make out the dark parts of a circle where the tyloses have formed in the sapwood of infected elm. AFAIK the fungus (whose name has changed again but ?? ulmi) is single celled yeast like so probably has no obvious fruiting body.

Think you may be correct about the fact that it may be oak looking at the medullary rays,  but above the log in the bottom picture it does look like Elm as there seem to be beetle tracks under the bark.  I think that is what caused me to think that the whole load was Elm.  I must pay more attention to logging the logs I cut for the log box!

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2 minutes ago, Billhook said:

Think you may be correct about the fact that it may be oak looking at the medullary rays,  but above the log in the bottom picture it does look like Elm as there seem to be beetle tracks under the bark.  I think that is what caused me to think that the whole load was Elm.  I must pay more attention to logging the logs I cut for the log box!

The one above looked like elm.

 

I wonder if spring summer felled oak gets more mould than winter felled as there are less sugars in the sap, not there is less mould on the heartwood.

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