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chrisjd

Hedge restoration near Oxford

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I'm looking for some help with restoring a hedge on a 3 acre paddock near Oxford.  It likely requires a mix of laying, coppicing and gapping up, although some of it is in reasonable condition.  Can anyone provide any advice with regards to likely cost and/or suggest a local person/firm who does this kind of work please?

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3 minutes ago, chrisjd said:

I'm looking for some help with restoring a hedge on a 3 acre paddock near Oxford.  It likely requires a mix of laying, coppicing and gapping up, although some of it is in reasonable condition.  Can anyone provide any advice with regards to likely cost and/or suggest a local person/firm who does this kind of work please?

Its going to be difficult to say without seeing it,can you put some pictures up?

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2 hours ago, chrisjd said:

I'm looking for some help with restoring a hedge on a 3 acre paddock near Oxford.  It likely requires a mix of laying, coppicing and gapping up, although some of it is in reasonable condition.  Can anyone provide any advice with regards to likely cost and/or suggest a local person/firm who does this kind of work please?

Steve Mabbut hedge laying specialist near Northampton.  K

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13 hours ago, gary112 said:

Its going to be difficult to say without seeing it,can you put some pictures up?

Will try and dig a couple out - I'm living away from the area so can't take a current picture, but can find a couple.

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This is a useful  sytem imo

 

HEDGEROWSURVEY.PTES.ORG

 

 

 

Most round here  majority are either:

 

 

H1 Over-trimmed H1.jpgH1

  • Heavily over-trimmed, hard knuckle at trim line
  • Many gaps, sparse stems
  • Bases may be gnarled or rotting
  • Usually low and narrow
  • May be invaded by elder, sycamore or other invasive sp.
  • Lacks branches and foliage in the lower parts
  • Closely and frequently flailed to the same line

 

 

Or

 

H9 Tall or overgrownH9.jpgH9

  • Over-mature hedgerow, tall and leggy
  • Spreading tops might be dying back
  • Collapse possible
  • No significant woody foliage in the lower parts
  • May be developing gaps

 

 

 

 

 

 

Not as many ones inbetween. And probably 80% less hedge trees since the elms died.

Edited by Stere
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Sorry I completely missed this! If you need a hand next season I am Oxford based and happy to quote

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@chrisjd - see above if you're still around.

 

@kav - the '@' may alert him to your offer 🤞

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On 30/10/2020 at 08:46, Stere said:

This is a useful  sytem imo

 

HEDGEROWSURVEY.PTES.ORG

 

 

 

Most round here  majority are either:

 

 

H1 Over-trimmed H1.jpgH1

  • Heavily over-trimmed, hard knuckle at trim line
  • Many gaps, sparse stems
  • Bases may be gnarled or rotting
  • Usually low and narrow
  • May be invaded by elder, sycamore or other invasive sp.
  • Lacks branches and foliage in the lower parts
  • Closely and frequently flailed to the same line

 

 

Or

 

H9 Tall or overgrownH9.jpgH9

  • Over-mature hedgerow, tall and leggy
  • Spreading tops might be dying back
  • Collapse possible
  • No significant woody foliage in the lower parts
  • May be developing gaps

 

 

 

 

 

 

Not as many ones inbetween. And probably 80% less hedge trees since the elms died.

If a native hedge isn't laid, it isn't a hedge, it's a line of trees. 

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H10.jpg

H10 Tall or overgrown – line of trees

  • Hedgerow has developed into a line of trees
  • Very little, if any, woody undergrowth

 

 

 

 

 

Locally the "wild"  blackthorn hedges seem to have a decent  mix of trees & species.

 

Bullace is very common, also some ash sycamore, elder, hazel, honeysuckle rose etc. Beech oak  & holly rare.

 

The hawthorn hedges are often 100% hawthorn for long lengths so few bigger trees species around to seed  into in thoose neglected hedges

 

Ash the  remaining predominant hedge tree are now all being felled -  with ADB,   and next to  nothing has being allowed to grow up &  replace any of them.

 

Would be nice to select a few sycamore to let some grow up as that is the only large tree species left thats common here.

 

 

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