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Aaron9546

Help with tree structure.

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I have a young Oak (~3yrs) currently with a co-dominant stem. Eventually I plan to cut one of the stems (highlighted in red) off and keep the other. I'm worried about the the stem I want to keep since it's bending, albeit much less than the other stem but I've heard that any bending like this can be dangerous in storms (at a later stage) if it continues to grow in that direction. The trunk is quite straight until it gets to the two stems which both bend in opposite directions. Do you think the stem I'm keeping will in time correct itself and become straight (it is quite flexible as of now) or will I have to use some sort of anchor attachment to straighten it artificially? Thanks.

 

I've asked a similar question before regarding pruning but didn't give this question much consideration at the time.

20201020_162933.jpg

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32 minutes ago, Aaron9546 said:

I have a young Oak (~3yrs) currently with a co-dominant stem. Eventually I plan to cut one of the stems (highlighted in red) off and keep the other. I'm worried about the the stem I want to keep since it's bending, albeit much less than the other stem but I've heard that any bending like this can be dangerous in storms (at a later stage) if it continues to grow in that direction. The trunk is quite straight until it gets to the two stems which both bend in opposite directions. Do you think the stem I'm keeping will in time correct itself and become straight (it is quite flexible as of now) or will I have to use some sort of anchor attachment to straighten it artificially? Thanks.

 

I've asked a similar question before regarding pruning but didn't give this question much consideration at the time.

20201020_162933.jpg

It will head for the light . With the other stem removed it will probably straiten up .  Look at " plantation " trees . They grow " gun barrel strait because they are surrounded by the other trees so everyone is going up and competing for the  light .

Edited by Stubby
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10 minutes ago, Stubby said:

It will head for the light . With the other stem removed it will probably straiten up .  Look at " plantation " trees . They grow " gun barrel strait because they are surrounded by the other trees so everyone is going up and competing for the  light .

Well this is what I hope will happen. But if it comes down to it, I would rather the bend be facing the field opposite us lol or at least as straight as we can get it to grow - I don't know how effective an anchor type placement would be over the natural system.

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2 hours ago, Aaron9546 said:

Eventually I plan to cut one of the stems (highlighted in red) off and keep the other.

Don't cut it off yet but disadvantage it by reducing it at this stage. Then once the tree is fully established start lifting in stages keeping the crown to  40% of the height. Aim to get all your formative pruning done before the stem is 4" diameter and while branches being removed are small diameter.

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27 minutes ago, openspaceman said:

Don't cut it off yet but disadvantage it by reducing it at this stage. Then once the tree is fully established start lifting in stages keeping the crown to  40% of the height. Aim to get all your formative pruning done before the stem is 4" diameter and while branches being removed are small diameter.

Is that because the co-stem is too long to fully remove for now? So when the tree is estaished (1 year?), I should start pruning the lower branches up to half or just above half of the total length of the tree? The stem is pretty thin in diameter for now. Thanks

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46 minutes ago, Aaron9546 said:

Is that because the co-stem is too long to fully remove for now? So when the tree is estaished (1 year?), I should start pruning the lower branches up to half or just above half of the total length of the tree? The stem is pretty thin in diameter for now. Thanks

No it's just that you want to keep as much leaf to contribute to growth, when I'm walking through young planting I'll often just snap the tip of a co dominant stem.

 

I'm thinking 5+ years but the main thing is to keep wounds small and before any heartwood is formed in the branch.

 

The reason for formative pruning is to produce a clean stem, the advantage is that  then there are no low down branches for someone to come along and hack off once they are loo large to heal sensibly, it also means  no  poor branch unions low down will fail in the future as a tear out with bark inclusion.

 

 

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