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When Steve asked if I would like to test and review the ECHO DCS-2500T I was very honoured and couldn’t wait to get my hands on it. As a predominantly freelance climber, I carry out a range of works, from big tree removals to smaller pruning works. As a result I rely on a selection of different sized saws depending on the job in hand. After seeing the stats for this saw on paper I was intrigued to see how such a small battery saw would stand up to the rigours of our job.

I was contacted by a helpful lady from Echo to arrange delivery of the saw. Sure enough, a couple of days later a big box arrived and I eagerly unpacked it. I have had experience using some of the other battery powered arborist saws on the market so had a preconceived idea of what to expect. What I revealed what was at first glance, a very modern and brightly coloured little saw, and smaller than anything I had previously used.
 

Initial thoughts on the ECHO DCS-2500T

My first reaction when picking up the ECHO DCS-2500T was how light the saw was. and the ergonomics seemed spot on, with the top handle fitting perfectly into my hand. I particularly liked the design of the side handle, how it swooped from the front of the top handle to the back of the saw…this is a great design by Echo, both ergonomically and aesthetically pleasing!

When putting the saw together i noticed that there wasn't a sprocket in the tip of the guide bar provided. I was initially concerned that this might hamper the saws performance but it didn't seem to! I turned the oiler up to max and waited for the first opportunity to put the saw to work!
 

First use of ECHO's battery pruning chainsaw

The first few times the saw was put to work was on some very small pruning cuts which it performed impeccably on! The narrow kerf of the bar and small chain pitch made for some very clean cuts that would almost rival a hand pruning saw. To my surprise the battery hardly seemed to be losing any charge during these initial works. I had been going easy on it, as due to only having 1 battery I wanted to make it last as long as possible. With plenty of power still left towards the end of the day I decided to give it a try on a small silver birch removal. Nothing too taxing there, just a few small limbs to remove and then a smallish stem to section down.

 

IMG-20200707-WA0016.jpg


With almost a fully charged battery still, I proceeded with the removal and mostly completed it with the exception of the last few remaining sections of the stem. I was somewhat restricted in only having one battery, and quickly realised the only way to work with these saws for a full shift would be with a minimum of 2 batteries and a nearby power source to charge them in-between turns.

Over the course of the past 10 weeks I have had the pleasure of using this saw on all manner of tree works, from pruning to removals. It never ceases to amaze me how this saw manages to chop its way through larger diameter timber. The only downside is that this does drain the power pretty fast, and a sharp saw and light hand is needed to prevent the saw from bogging down. It would generally be my recommendation to move over to a larger saw before getting to this point, and keeping the ECHO for what it is meant for.

One of my favourite features on this saw is the patented harness clip which makes the saw perhaps one of the easiest saws to stow that I have ever had the pleasure of using. This should be a standard feature on all arborist saws!

 

IMG-20200625-WA0005.jpg

 

My experience with the saw as a go to small pruner and possible small tree removal tool overall is that its a joy to use. The smooth, quick chain speed and overall weight of the saw really lowers fatigue. More importantly, as any climber will tell you thats been in the game long enough, wear and tear on your limbs adds up over time. Stress on your joints is significantly reduced with this saw and using it in preference to one of the traditional petrol top handled saws(on suitable jobs), will pay dividends in the long run! In the tree it almost removes the need to use a hand saw, which again saves energy and yet more fatigue. The added benefit of not having to pull start the saw is particularly nice, especially when on the extremity of a large limb. My shoulders and elbows almost felt like they were on holiday!

Based on all the points above I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend this saw to any professional looking for a serious replacement to their petrol powered pruning saws.
 

Conclusion

In closing, don’t let the size of this saw fool you. Its an incredibly capable tool for all manner of tree works, and whilst it is fundamentally a pruning saw, it is more than capable of cutting through timber with a diameter equal to its bar length when needed. This saw has really made me realise what might be achievable long term in the battery chainsaw market, and I look forward to seeing what comes next from ECHO.


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Can't agree more. I've only had a short test of this saw and it was a pleasure to use. If I was still climbing properly I'd have one without doubt. Definitely a need for two batteries, but I'd say that for any battery saw. 

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And we have them all here - bear in mind we can't export the batteries so if you are further afield then by the bar body, charger, bar and chains and source the battery in your own country.

 

Panther mini bars with a sprocket nose are a better option than the 1/4 .043 carving bar Echo provide [bear in mind this is our brand so naturally highly biased!]

 

 

WWW.CHAINSAWBARS.CO.UK

 

image.thumb.png.bb49c6702eb822e170f38088c91ac996.png

 

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If you want to watch a vid without all the usual nonsense that surrounds a promo vid then made one here.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Rob D said:

Panther mini bars with a sprocket nose are a better option than the 1/4 .043 carving bar Echo provide

I know the small tip on a carving bar is to reduce kickback but is it solid because a sprocket tip cannot be made this small?

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1 hour ago, openspaceman said:

I know the small tip on a carving bar is to reduce kickback but is it solid because a sprocket tip cannot be made this small?

 

You don't need sprockets this small - the Stihl and Panther mini bars running 1/4 .043 have very little kick back. They are using carving bars for supply reasons I suspect and prob in the end they will issue with a sprocket nose bar that runs 1/4 .043.

 

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Are the Echo batteries backward compatible? Had a wee Echo topping saw, loved its idle burble. Gonna splash for the Husq battery but need to know which is tooled in more. Gone are the days when ye need to buy a battery for each & every tool. That was so scammy. Hopefully that made sense 🙃

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Hi! Bigtreedon.

I am one of Echo engneer who did develop the chain saw.

Regarding the harmess clip, looks like you are using wrong hook.

The hook on your picture is for safety leash code and the patented harness clip is on very end of the saw.

You can find thin metal ring and the ring is the clip.

Please see attached Youtube movie so you can learn how to use the clip.

If you learn it, you can clip on and off by ONLY ONE HAND so you can get more confortable on tree.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4xWeLF2lbNY

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Hi! Bigtreedon.
I am one of Echo engneer who did develop the chain saw.
Regarding the harmess clip, looks like you are using wrong hook.
The hook on your picture is for safety leash code and the patented harness clip is on very end of the saw.
You can find thin metal ring and the ring is the clip.
Please see attached Youtube movie so you can learn how to use the clip.
If you learn it, you can clip on and off by ONLY ONE HAND so you can get more confortable on tree.
 

What would I of done without this advice

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12 hours ago, bigtreedon said:

What would I of done without this advice emoji849.png

Come now, it's good to see anybody from a manufacturer making an effort to contribute.

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