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LogGoblin

Pallet wrapped wood seasoning

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3 minutes ago, Alycidon said:

There are for and against s in the to dry issue.   For is that the less moisture in a log the less energy is wasted evaporating it, thus more energy is converted into heat.    

 

Against,  Research by a leading stove manufacturer advises that the optimum moisture level for minimal emissions is 10% - 12%.   Less ( or more) than that and the emissions levels increase.

 

A

The only research I would trust is direct from a University who have no vested interest in the conclusions.

We all know that leading stove manufacturers have been telling consumers to only burn kiln dried Hardwood for years, none of which is sustainable.

Most stove retailers promote only kiln dried hardwood as that is what they sell.

 

Basically it is common knowledge the fastest way to dry timber is with airflow, heat ideally the 2 combined. The poster needs to basically mirror a polytunnel - solar gain from the sun and very good airflow with the prevailing wind blowing through the stack.

Worst scenario possibly is wrap in plastic.

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38 minutes ago, arboriculturist said:

The only research I would trust is direct from a University who have no vested interest in the conclusions.

We all know that leading stove manufacturers have been telling consumers to only burn kiln dried Hardwood for years, none of which is sustainable.

Most stove retailers promote only kiln dried hardwood as that is what they sell.

 

Basically it is common knowledge the fastest way to dry timber is with airflow, heat ideally the 2 combined. The poster needs to basically mirror a polytunnel - solar gain from the sun and very good airflow with the prevailing wind blowing through the stack.

Worst scenario possibly is wrap in plastic.

As a stove retailer myself you would be surprised by the state of the wood some people try and burn.   Kiln drying if done properly ( and many dont) has several advantages over seasoned, the main one being no woodworm etc in the logs.   

 

I sell a fair bit of seasoned myself,  this I cut into vented bags and store in an open dutch barn stacked 2 high,   works well.

 

A

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43 minutes ago, Alycidon said:

I sell a fair bit of seasoned myself,  this I cut into vented bags and store in an open dutch barn stacked 2 high,   works well.

Does it dry to the 10% mc you advocate?

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23 minutes ago, openspaceman said:

Does it dry to the 10% mc you advocate?

Its not me that advocates it, its a major UK stove manufacturer.   My cord sits for a couple of years in the open,  then gets processed March/April time and put in the barn.    MC external starts at about 8% in Sept but over the winter moves out to 14% - 16%.   Dont get any complaints.

 

A

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14 minutes ago, Alycidon said:

My cord sits for a couple of years in the open,  then gets processed March/April time and put in the barn.    MC external starts at about 8% in Sept but over the winter moves out to 14% - 16%.

Yes this is much my experience also but does lead to the conclusion that it is a waste of energy to force dry below about 16% unless it is to be burned before the moisture level has had time to increase.

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20 minutes ago, openspaceman said:

Yes this is much my experience also but does lead to the conclusion that it is a waste of energy to force dry below about 16% unless it is to be burned before the moisture level has had time to increase.

Agreed,  wood is hydroscopic and does pic up moisture from the atmosphere.   But I mainly deliver wood that will be stored in garages,,   so kiln dried with no wood worm etc is a bit safer, dont want a complaint that wood worm from my logs has got into a house timbers.   Do get regular calls about ash bark beetle in seasoned at this time of year though,  that can be frightening for the home owner.

 

A

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8 minutes ago, Alycidon said:

so kiln dried with no wood worm etc is a bit safer, dont want a complaint that wood worm from my logs has got into a house timbers.   Do get regular calls about ash bark beetle in seasoned at this time of year though,  that can be frightening for the home owner.

Yes high temperature sterilises dry wood but warming wet wood leads to mould growth.

 

By far the major amount of energy needed to dry wood from green is that which is used to turn water into vapour.

 

The corollary is that  wood that is air dried only needs a small amount of heat to sterilise it and polish off the last bits of moisture.

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2 hours ago, Alycidon said:

As a stove retailer myself you would be surprised by the state of the wood some people try and burn.   Kiln drying if done properly ( and many dont) has several advantages over seasoned, the main one being no woodworm etc in the logs.   

 

I sell a fair bit of seasoned myself,  this I cut into vented bags and store in an open dutch barn stacked 2 high,   works well.

 

A

So what are the several advantages of kiln dried over say air dried firewood at 16% MC, as I am struggling to find them ?

 

I can honestly say I have never had woodworm larvae in any of our firewood logs.

 

So how do you assess the MC of the Kiln dried and the air dried you sell - by Titration testing or wet basis moisture meter?

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1 hour ago, Alycidon said:

Agreed,  wood is hydroscopic and does pic up moisture from the atmosphere.   But I mainly deliver wood that will be stored in garages,,   so kiln dried with no wood worm etc is a bit safer, dont want a complaint that wood worm from my logs has got into a house timbers.   Do get regular calls about ash bark beetle in seasoned at this time of year though,  that can be frightening for the home owner.

 

A

Wood is not hydroscopic .  . Wood is however hygroscopic . As is Nylon and lots of other things .   20% moisture is 20% moisture how ever it is achieved .

Edited by Stubby
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4 hours ago, arboriculturist said:

The only research I would trust is direct from a University who have no vested interest in the conclusions.

We all know that leading stove manufacturers have been telling consumers to only burn kiln dried Hardwood for years, none of which is sustainable.

Most stove retailers promote only kiln dried hardwood as that is what they sell.

 

Basically it is common knowledge the fastest way to dry timber is with airflow, heat ideally the 2 combined. The poster needs to basically mirror a polytunnel - solar gain from the sun and very good airflow with the prevailing wind blowing through the stack.

Worst scenario possibly is wrap in plastic.

Just to clarify, I wasn't asking for advice. 

 

The post was about the anecdotal findings of an experiment based on harnessing radiant energy and unidirectional air flow using inexpensive materials. 

 

I didn't just wrap some wood in pallet wrap. 

 

Thanks for your comment though. 

Edited by LogGoblin
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