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Does this wound need special care?


tgoetheyn
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Yes leave the wound alone. Trees have evolved to cope with breakages, the tree knows best. Apart from paring the torn bark back I'd do nothing else. Reduction would remove capacity for the tree to heal the wound. Wind loads will have been present before breakage and the tree should already have strength in response to the loads. Wind flexure stimulates woundwood. Reduction will slow that down. The pictures show adaptive growth already, the branch failure looks (with hindsight) like it was inevitable and the tree is already coping. Let nature do its thing. Potions and concoctions will interfere with optimum natural processes.

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On 02/10/2020 at 20:01, treeseer said:

Not sure pruning is necessary or helpful..  DEFinitely leave all growth near the wound--it will nourish its closure.

The remaining leader is now exposed to the wind. Its a young tree and I would rather take 1m off the top (which is nothing for a young tree as you know), then risk the tree snapping at the original junction. The stem that failed was on the  windward side looking at the picture, so the failed stem was protecting the other stem to an extent, from the full force of the wind.

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The generality of that is true, although I don't see how you can tell the prevailing wind direction from the pics. But it's a tiny tree, can't be much in the way of risk or lever arm. These decisions should always be situation-specific. Generally I am in the 'leave the poor bloody tree alone' camp. Reducing height redistributes growth hormones, can result in overextension of limbs and longer term problems. Especially if there are other inclusion forks.

 

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8 hours ago, daltontrees said:

The generality of that is true, although I don't see how you can tell the prevailing wind direction from the pics. But it's a tiny tree, can't be much in the way of risk or lever arm. These decisions should always be situation-specific. Generally I am in the 'leave the poor bloody tree alone' camp. Reducing height redistributes growth hormones, can result in overextension of limbs and longer term problems. Especially if there are other inclusion forks.

 

Fair Point Jules

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14 hours ago, daltontrees said:

The generality of that is true, although I don't see how you can tell the prevailing wind direction from the pics. But it's a tiny tree, can't be much in the way of risk or lever arm. These decisions should always be situation-specific. Generally I am in the 'leave the poor bloody tree alone' camp. Reducing height redistributes growth hormones, can result in overextension of limbs and longer term problems. Especially if there are other inclusion forks.

 

....and 200+  epicormic limes contracts wont contradict you  ;) ( bread n butter I know  )  K

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