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asif

Will my apple tree die if i lay artificial turf on top?

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Hi all,

 

We have a beautiful apple tree in out garden which is 3 years old and has tons of apples per year.


Its sits on a flower bed and we were thinking of laying artificial turf to stop the constant weeds!

 

The turf would also have to go around the apple tree so would this kill the tree if water cant get in?

 

Picture attached. 

 

Many thanks!

 

Asif 

20200705_091602.jpg

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Why not just get a delivery of wood chip and put that down, it helps stop weeds and lets water through and helps retain moisture for the tree.

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Also may be a  hassle to clean leaves weeds etc off the fake grass and looks rubbish

Edited by Stere
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I realise I am a bit old fashioned, but why would anyone install plastic grass in their garden?  Anyone who has seen the Blue Planet programmes in the last year or two will understand what a massive problem plastic is.  Why deliberately fill your garden with it?

 

Wood chip sounds like the answer.  If only there was a website frequented by arboriculturalists who might even offer some free woodchip delivered if they were working locally.......!

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2 hours ago, Ian C said:

Why not just get a delivery of wood chip and put that down, it helps stop weeds and lets water through and helps retain moisture for the tree.

And a whole lot more environmentally friendly than artificial turf.

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Here's a thought....

 

Plastic grass - not so good

Woodchip - better, but not the best option

 

Wildflower seed - a great option on many levels!

 

Low cost & low maintenance.  Looks like the ground would simply need a rake over.  Sow from seed in September.  Depending on seed selection (there are many proprietary suppliers that provide variations best suited to colour, bees, butterflies, flowering duration etc, etc - you have to put a bit of thought into what you deem most suitable / desirable.)

 

1 cut per year, just let it grow and 'do its thing.'  A changing palette of colour and interest throughout the seasons.  Cut in late Summer / Autumn, leave it lay for a few days after cutting so that the seeds fall to ground to regenerate next year (or provide bird food.). Clear and compost.  It'll all come back stronger year on year.

 

Pic's attached of a small section of garden I gave over to wildflower this Spring.  It is beautiful, it is no maintenance, it is literally buzzing with pollinator activity, there are field mice in the bottom, the little one comes out each day to search for the latest new flowers.  

 

It might not be right for every situation but it is SERIOUSLY worth giving it some thought.

 

 

 

 

IMG_4200.jpeg

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Edited by kevinjohnsonmbe
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Here's a thought....
 
Plastic grass - not so good
Woodchip - better, but not the best option
 
Wildflower seed - a great option on many levels!
 
Low cost & low maintenance.  Looks like the ground would simply need a rake over.  Sow from seed in September.  Depending on seed selection (there are many proprietary suppliers that provide variations best suited to colour, bees, butterflies, flowering duration etc, etc - you have to put a bit of thought into what you deem most suitable / desirable.)
 
1 cut per year, just let it grow and 'do its thing.'  A changing palette of colour and interest throughout the seasons.  Cut in late Summer / Autumn, leave it lay for a few days after cutting so that the seeds fall to ground to regenerate next year (or provide bird food.). Clear and compost.  It'll all come back stronger year on year.
 
Pic's attached of a small section of garden I gave over to wildflower this Spring.  It is beautiful, it is no maintenance, it is literally buzzing with pollinator activity, there are field mice in the bottom, the little one comes out each day to search for the latest new flowers.  
 
It might not be right for every situation but it is SERIOUSLY worth giving it some thought.
 
 
 
 
IMG_4200.thumb.jpeg.f4ccc6cd202b2ae5548247a510076d7d.jpeg
IMG_4198.thumb.jpeg.0cf5e7b1777c511de320914bd64f303b.jpeg
IMG_4039.thumb.jpeg.3fee394f343cbcfefde4c1a5a82b6c26.jpeg
IMG_4037.thumb.jpeg.78c98aa99659ab367c6b7de227636f1c.jpeg

Now that is great, solid, advice!
Nice patch KJ
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Was on the telly yesterday (I think) that borage refills its nectar supply in just 2 minutes after a bee visit whereas other plants take hours.

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3 hours ago, Squaredy said:

I realise I am a bit old fashioned, but why would anyone install plastic grass in their garden?  Anyone who has seen the Blue Planet programmes in the last year or two will understand what a massive problem plastic is.  Why deliberately fill your garden with it?

 

Wood chip sounds like the answer.  If only there was a website frequented by arboriculturalists who might even offer some free woodchip delivered if they were working locally.......!

..... I will believe that when i see it  ? K

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