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Fungus on Scot Pine

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Hello Friends,

 

I really need an urgent help for this nice tree that I have. Its a nice some 30 year old tree. For last three years I can see its needles are falling. Mt tree has become bare of needles. I tried looking up the symptoms on internet yesterday and it seems it is suffering from Dothistroma or brown spot.

 

Does someone have experienced this and know which fungicide is known to remove this fungus. Mencozeb was suggested on internet.

 

As it is a very dear tree for me, I would really appreciate any guidance to get it back in health.

 

Thanks for your inputs.

 

Regards

Nishant

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You might want to consider re-potting (or planting) it & adding new soil with organic mix, as it looks to have run out of resource for its roots.

 

It will be stressed in this condition and open to attack from various pests and disease.

 

 

 

 

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Agree with all David says, get it out that pot and into the ground with plenty of organic matter as a mulch, not round the trunk and plenty of watering until well established, might be worth putting watering tube. Where about's are you as the ground looks dry and impoverished and its been very dry and not recently.

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Hello All, Many Thanks for your replies. It is kept small using the bonsai techniques. As you can see the tree came full of cones, which makes me belive that the tree has enough health. It is only in late spring and summer that the needles start falling. I do water it every day with rainwater and prevent it from harsh sun in second half of the day as it is under a plum tree. So water deficiency, I dont think is the issue. Neither is fertilizer as I feed it with liquid fish emulsion.

 

I repotted it two years back. It was in even smaller pot with the person with had it for 30 years.

 

As I asked for, it is a fungal disease Dothistroma or brown spot. Has anyone had experience with treating needle blight on Pines?

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Edited by tree_stumps

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5 hours ago, tree_stumps said:

Hello All, Many Thanks for your replies. It is kept small using the bonsai techniques. As you can see the tree came full of cones, which makes me belive that the tree has enough health. It is only in late spring and summer that the needles start falling. I do water it every day with rainwater and prevent it from harsh sun in second half of the day as it is under a plum tree. So water deficiency, I dont think is the issue. Neither is fertilizer as I feed it with liquid fish emulsion.

 

I repotted it two years back. It was in even smaller pot with the person with had it for 30 years.

 

As I asked for, it is a fungal disease Dothistroma or brown spot. Has anyone had experience with treating needle blight on Pines?

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The Japanese used to bind young girls feet to stop them growing . Don't make it right . Plant it in the ground , teas the roots out from being pot bound and let it live . ....Just my take on it . 😏

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I will come back may be soon after treating with Copper fungicide, may be around August.

 

It comes back to great health in winter when the temprature comes down. Last year it flowered earlier while the tempratures was still low. But even the year before this picture was taken, the needles had fallen a lot.

 

I am concerned because if this continues for a few years, the tree will weaken. I am pretty sure its just fungus attack.

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Edited by tree_stumps

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What climate are you in?

 

I think you need a bonsai or gardening forum. It is very difficult to keep a tree small and healthy.

The way to make the tree grow well is to plant it in the ground. To keep it in a pot you need expertise that you won't find here.

 

If it is 30 years old then is shouldn't be growing so much as you show? I don't know this is correct but it seems that it is growing too strongly.

 

Copper should be used carefully - it is very poisonous to soil health.

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On 05/06/2020 at 18:32, Stubby said:

The Japanese used to bind young girls feet to stop them growing . Don't make it right . Plant it in the ground , teas the roots out from being pot bound and let it live . ....Just my take on it . 😏

Not a fan of Japanese methods Mr @Stubby  ? 'They just make dam'n good cameras thou'   '  😁  K

 

( fiver for you if you name that film quote )

 

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