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Thesnarlingbadger

Building an ally plank tipper back myself. Advice needed

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Hi all,

 

My box steel ally-composite back on my transit that I built roughly 4 years ago is starting to look a bit shagged and it’s getting to replacement time.

 

I built the back on a bit of a budget back then an it’s served me well but would now like to rip the whole lot off and redo everything with ally planks but it’s turning into a bit of a minefield.

 

I’ve had a few quotes of some coach builders and they are saying between 7-10k. I could buy a truck with money already on for that so I think best to do it myself. I’m pretty handy when it comes to welding steel but would be at a loss welding ally.

 

So I just want to get some ideas on how to go about things. I was thinking box steal framework and then ally planks slotted in. But I know I’m likely to get corrosion this way so is there another way around it?

 

I’d rather use ally box for the frame but would worry that the welding side of things would let me down here. Any suggestions?

 

I know service metals are pretty good and I’m planning to call them on Tuesday and have a word.

 

What have you guys done? Has anyone got any pictures of how they have done their own ally backs?

 

I’m aware it’s not going to be straight forward but if it saves me 5k and adds to my knowledge then it’s worth doing right.

 

Any thoughts or suggestions welcome.

 

 

Thanks in advance

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If you can fabricate/weld etc then salvage/repair your subframe, tipping floor and corner posts (all in steel). Then get ali planks to the correct size with the correct channel profiles to close the ends, clip them together (they can need a bit of persuading to clip in - don’t be gentle but make sure you don’t wreck them!) and then bolt the sides and headboards to your steel corner uprights. The ali board panels are strong enough to not need full framing.

Tail gate build the same way out of ali and bolt steel hinge pieces on  (weld the other halves to your rear corner posts). 
You’ll do it for less than £2k I reckon.

Edited by monkeybusiness
Steel isn’t spelt steep.

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Try Boulter tippers ltd I think they are called, they are very reasonable. Worth a price up from them and weigh up to buy material and do it yourself or use them.

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8 minutes ago, Lm20 said:

Try Boulter tippers ltd I think they are called, they are very reasonable. Worth a price up from them and weigh up to buy material and do it yourself or use them.

Nice one I'll give them a try. To be honest I was quite looking forward to doing it myself as I enjoy a challenge but If I can get it done by someone else to save me time (which I seem to have less and less of) then I will.

 

 However still looking for tips and surgeons from people on this as I am still keen to do it myself.

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Put a smear of silicone sealant between the steel and ali where you fix them so help prevent galvanic corrosion and rattle.

 

You could always make up your steel framework and then get it galvanised

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2 minutes ago, tree_beard said:

Put a smear of silicone sealant between the steel and ali where you fix them so help prevent galvanic corrosion and rattle.

 

You could always make up your steel framework and then get it galvanised

Would gala not corrode the ally then?

 

 I'm happy to spend a bit of cash on this project. so am more than happy to get the framework galvanised. Is there much involved in the process?

 

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The zinc coating is much less reactive with ali than non galv i'd still silicone all connecting surfaces tho.

The process is as simple as dropping your steel components at a galvanising company and picking them up all shiny the next day. Or leaving them with a local fabricator that has their products galved and waiting until they send a batch off...

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I’m just planning a Hilux extra cab tipping tray back build with extra boards to make it an arb box body. I do other work as well as trees so need to be able to get ton bags or loads of timber on the truck too.

Current plan is steel frame with ladder bar, 400mm deep drop sides with 1m deep drop in sides with barn doors on them. Tie bar across the top.

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Just be ready for a bit of movement/bending/twisting from galvanising. And make sure you drill plenty of drain holes to allow the zinc in/out of your box section.

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