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31 minutes ago, openspaceman said:

You misquoted me, I reported a half life in air.

A quote from this lady:

 

Dr. Angela Rasmussen (interview recorded March 15, 2020)

 

"Yeah, so a great pre-print just came out. I like to pitch my collaborators at Rocky
Mountain Labs, this is Neeltje van Doremalen who is with Vincent Munster at NIAI
Rocky Mountain Labs have just released a preprint with some of their colleagues, I
believe at Princeton, showing that SARS-coronavirus-2 and SARS classic have some
different properties as well as some similar properties for remaining infectious on
various surfaces. So they looked at experimentally generated aerosols, which for
SARS-coronaviruses is only an issue for the most part in hospital settings where
there are aerosol generating procedures, but they showed that for both of these,
the aerosol half-life is only about three hours. So that's good news in that you
know, if somebody that you love or care about is working in a hospital or an ICU or
is getting treated there, these aerosols are not going to persist for days at a time in
the environment. They also looked at survival of the virus on copper, stainless steel,
plastic and cardboard, and the virus lasts the longest on stainless steel and plastic.
So it lasts 48 to 72 hours, and it can potentially be there for longer than that, but
what's important to note is that there was a three-log reduction, so a thousand
times less virus that was infectious after 72 hours. So, even though you can detect
infectious virus on surfaces, plastic or stainless steel surfaces after three days, it's a
greatly reduced amount of virus. Compared to SARS classic, SARS-coronavirus-2
lasted longer on cardboard, however it didn't last longer than 24 hours. So before
everybody gets worried about getting packages in the mail or opening letters or
calling, ordering stuff from Amazon it, it also was essentially undetectable after 24
hours. So cardboard is probably not a surface that's going to retain the virus for, for
days and days at a time. What we don't know is the effect that temperature and
humidity and other environmental conditions would have on this "

 

Sorry, can you explain that for me then please? It sounded like you said the virus can remain in the air for at least 3 hours.

 

 

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The WHO says that "according to current evidence," the virus is transmitted through "respiratory droplets and contact routes." By that, the agency means the virus is found in the kind of big droplets of mucus or saliva created through coughing and sneezing.

These droplets can travel only short distances through the air and either land on people or land on surfaces that people later touch. Stopping this kind of transmission is why public health officials urge people to wash hands frequently and not touch the face, because that could bring the virus into contact with the nose or mouth.

 

Other viruses, however, get shed by infected people in a way that lets the germs actually hang suspended in the air for minutes or even hours. Later, these airborne viruses can get breathed in when other people pass by. Measles is a good example of that kind of transmission — the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says, "Measles virus can remain infectious in the air for up to two hours after an infected person leaves an area."

 

 

Among patients infected with SARS-CoV-2, viral loads in the upper respiratory tract are high; as a consequence, respiratory secretion in the form of aerosols (<5 µm) or droplets (>5 µm) is likely, the authors note.

van Doremalen and colleagues used nebulizers to generate aerosols. Samples of SARS-CoV-1 and SARS-CoV-2 were collecting at 0, 30, 60, 120, and 180 minutes on a gelatin filter. The researchers then tested the infectivity of the viruses on Vero cells grown in culture.

They found that SARS-CoV-2 was largely stable through the full 180-minute test, with only a slight decline at 3 hours. This time course is similar to that of SARS-CoV-1; both viruses have a median half-life in aerosols of 2.7 hours (range, 1.65 hr for SARS-CoV-1, vs 7.24 hr for SARS-CoV-2).

 

they have to do the research, but then release the results in a way that won't make people too worried, difficult job

 

Edited by tree-fancier123

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43 minutes ago, Mesterh said:

Sorry, can you explain that for me then please? It sounded like you said the virus can remain in the air for at least 3 hours.

 

 

I think @tree-fancier123 has covered it.

 

As I read it most infected people out in the open air will cough out relatively large droplets, the chance of breathing one in will be small beyond 2 metres. In other, indoor, situations where droplets may be smaller ( I don't know why but they mention hospital procedures) the virus stays in the air and half of them disappear after 3 hours, it would take a further 3 hours to half the remainder and so on.

 

Now this may have limited consequence to most of us while only a small proportion of the public are infected and in the environment, where droplets and contact with surfaces will remain the main means of infection but with doctors and nurses up close and personal it looks like it becomes significant.

 

IMO they should only be examining people with a full hood, just like those Porton Down technicians did in Salisbury and not worry what the patient thinks.

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Jermery  decided it was to pricey so PHE had to water down PPE spec

 

WWW.THEGUARDIAN.COM

Exclusive: DoH dismissed call for eye protection – now needed for coronavirus – in 2017

 

Quote

One doctor wrote: “Coughed on by Covid patients all day today. No visors available…. tomorrow I’m borrowing my 9 year old’s safety specs she got in a science party bag. I wish this was actually a joke."

WWW.BMA.ORG.UK

BMA covid-19 Coronavirus PPE pesonal protective equipment

 

Also on masks:

 

WWW.SCIENCEMAG.ORG

George Gao, head of the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, offers insights from the front

 

 

Edited by Stere

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Well first day had a job put on hold until further notice..job was to reduce conifers for Hasall Construction Ltd who are based in Bath..they have shut there site down in Droitwich..but I just wanted to give them a shout because they have agreed to pay me the full amount and obviously do the job when possible which could be god know when so fair play to them for paying now as they didn’t need to do that.👍

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16 hours ago, tree-fancier123 said:

The WHO says that "according to current evidence," the virus is transmitted through "respiratory droplets and contact routes." By that, the agency means the virus is found in the kind of big droplets of mucus or saliva created through coughing and sneezing.

These droplets can travel only short distances through the air and either land on people or land on surfaces that people later touch. Stopping this kind of transmission is why public health officials urge people to wash hands frequently and not touch the face, because that could bring the virus into contact with the nose or mouth.

 

Other viruses, however, get shed by infected people in a way that lets the germs actually hang suspended in the air for minutes or even hours. Later, these airborne viruses can get breathed in when other people pass by. Measles is a good example of that kind of transmission — the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says, "Measles virus can remain infectious in the air for up to two hours after an infected person leaves an area."

 

 

Among patients infected with SARS-CoV-2, viral loads in the upper respiratory tract are high; as a consequence, respiratory secretion in the form of aerosols (<5 µm) or droplets (>5 µm) is likely, the authors note.

van Doremalen and colleagues used nebulizers to generate aerosols. Samples of SARS-CoV-1 and SARS-CoV-2 were collecting at 0, 30, 60, 120, and 180 minutes on a gelatin filter. The researchers then tested the infectivity of the viruses on Vero cells grown in culture.

They found that SARS-CoV-2 was largely stable through the full 180-minute test, with only a slight decline at 3 hours. This time course is similar to that of SARS-CoV-1; both viruses have a median half-life in aerosols of 2.7 hours (range, 1.65 hr for SARS-CoV-1, vs 7.24 hr for SARS-CoV-2).

 

they have to do the research, but then release the results in a way that won't make people too worried, difficult job

 

Hence a good strong mouthwash, you can wipe yr arse on that toilet paper nonsense 😋  k

Edited by Khriss
Then spit on yr hand when yr giving 'luck money' *to Mr Im not vat registerd pal Smith

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16 hours ago, openspaceman said:

I think @tree-fancier123 has covered it.

 

As I read it most infected people out in the open air will cough out relatively large droplets, the chance of breathing one in will be small beyond 2 metres. In other, indoor, situations where droplets may be smaller ( I don't know why but they mention hospital procedures) the virus stays in the air and half of them disappear after 3 hours, it would take a further 3 hours to half the remainder and so on.

 

Now this may have limited consequence to most of us while only a small proportion of the public are infected and in the environment, where droplets and contact with surfaces will remain the main means of infection but with doctors and nurses up close and personal it looks like it becomes significant.

 

IMO they should only be examining people with a full hood, just like those Porton Down technicians did in Salisbury and not worry what the patient thinks.

That doesn't sound too good at all! Let's hope the hospital workers get some much needed appropriate PPE supplies asap.

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11 minutes ago, Khriss said:

Hence a good strong mouthwash, you can wipe yr arse on that toilet paper nonsense 😋  k

when you think about the morbid last hours of someone dying from C-19 it is like drowning in their own mucus - oxygen starvation, then heart and kidney decline and failure. Soo it occured to me a novel high tech cure would be to get the blood out of the patient through a cannula and into an artificial lung that does the gas exchange instead of the lungs, preferably a device that could work of power tool batteries so the patient could walk about. 

Not quite so far fetched, but an encouraging developement in the news today

'A non-invasive breathing aid that can help to keep coronavirus patients from needing intensive care has been developed and approved in a matter of a few days.

The device, known as continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), was created by a partnership between the Mercedes Formula One team, University College London (UCL) and University College London Hospital (UCLH).

CPAP devices work by pushing a mix of oxygen and air into the mouth and nose at a continuous rate, thereby increasing the amount of oxygen that gets into the lungs. They bridge the gap between an oxygen mask and the need for full mechanical ventilation, during which the patient must be sedated.'

 

PS last time I saw someone spitting on their hand cant remember the name of the film..

  • Haha 1

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3 minutes ago, tree-fancier123 said:

when you think about the morbid last hours of someone dying from C-19 it is like drowning in their own mucus - oxygen starvation, then heart and kidney decline and failure. Soo it occured to me a novel high tech cure would be to get the blood out of the patient through a cannula and into an artificial lung that does the gas exchange instead of the lungs, preferably a device that could work of power tool batteries so the patient could walk about. 

Not quite so far fetched, but an encouraging developement in the news today

'A non-invasive breathing aid that can help to keep coronavirus patients from needing intensive care has been developed and approved in a matter of a few days.

The device, known as continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), was created by a partnership between the Mercedes Formula One team, University College London (UCL) and University College London Hospital (UCLH).

CPAP devices work by pushing a mix of oxygen and air into the mouth and nose at a continuous rate, thereby increasing the amount of oxygen that gets into the lungs. They bridge the gap between an oxygen mask and the need for full mechanical ventilation, during which the patient must be sedated.'

 

PS last time I saw someone spitting on their hand cant remember the name of the film..

Basically thats scuba gear. Yr regulator in yr mouth will pressurise yr lungs as much as you can suck. Come to Essex if the hand thing still doesnt make sense 😉  K

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18 hours ago, openspaceman said:

MO they should only be examining people with a full hood, just like those Porton Down technicians did in Salisbury and not worry what the patient thinks.

The number of staff members that patients interact with is scary, once you take into account nurses, catering staff, domestics and cleaners. As a patient it's better not to begin to calculate how many people all of these have come into contact with outside of the hospital.  

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