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mdvaden

Sequoiadendron 212 ft. / 64.6 m - Oregon, outside indigenous range

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Recently, our son and his wife moved to a camp in southern Oregon. I noticed a large trunk behind a wood shed, and realized it was a Sequoiadendron - cones, foliage, etc.. I went back to help sort an old wood pile, then afterward we measured the tree for fun. I was surprised to learn it was 212 feet tall. The diameter is over 7 ft. dbh. It's one of the best formed Sequoiadendron I've seen in the Pacific NW. A few others have emailed or suggested it may be the world's tallest planted Sequoiadendron outside the species natural range.

Here's a video I posted on Youtube:
 

 
 
 
 
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Super cool vid mdvaden. I have a good buddy who is doing most of the work in the Yosemite Valley and they took out a couple planted Sequoia's that were a little over 100 yrs old, were well over 200 ft, and over 8 ft at the Stump...Amazing how quickly these trees grow during there younger years...

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On 20/03/2020 at 20:08, Erik said:

Super cool vid mdvaden. I have a good buddy who is doing most of the work in the Yosemite Valley and they took out a couple planted Sequoia's that were a little over 100 yrs old, were well over 200 ft, and over 8 ft at the Stump...Amazing how quickly these trees grow during there younger years...

 

The tallest Sequoiadendron in the natural range is around 300 to 320 feet, thereabout. Wonder how long it takes any of those to make their way from 200 to 300.

Edited by mdvaden
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On 27/04/2020 at 03:49, Mr. Squirrel said:

I see what you mean, that really does have near perfect textbook form. What a beauty, nice find! 

Although my first measure was with taking 4 readings, I remeasured again two days ago just to be certain, and using two different lasers. Got 212 ft. once again. 

 

The top has almost no competition from other trees, so the height and reach for it's age in the top section has me curious about its growth.

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