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Wood burners: Most polluting fuels to be banned in the home

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On 21/02/2020 at 21:05, Alycidon said:

Now people this is far from new and well overdue.

 

This is part of the Europe Wide Eco Design initive designed to reduce emissions and increase efficiency,  its been coming for at least 4 years.    There is also a proposed ban on high sulpher man made smokeless fuels but maybe thats been dropped as its not being kicked around today.

 

As a stove retailer I get called out 3 or 4 times a year to a stove that is not generating the expected level of heat,  this has ALWAYS been caused by users burning wood that is wet.    Even kiln dried wood that has not been in a kiln for long enough ( so dry on the outside but wet in the middle) is being dished out in the market.   I went out Boxing day evening to take some logs to a single mother who had been given a load of kiln dried for Xmas that was 40% in the middle.

 

This is good news for people in the firewood industry who do a good job and sell dry wood,  if you sell green wood as ready to burn you will be in trouble.   Future sales of green will need to be 3 cu m or more and sold as that and the evidence recorded.    At the end of the day its not that hard to get seasoned wood below 20%,   split it and store under cover in a barn that is open on at least 2 sides,  leave it for 8 months or so and there you are.  

 

I bring in kiln dried from Lithuania yes.   stacked in crates,  easy to handle, around 100 quid for the equiv of 1.6 cu m if loose, and no processing.   MC is under 5% from my supplier.   I get three stacked crates onto my trailer so thats 575/630 quids worth of wood depending on species of timber,    with seasoned I get 2 x 1.2 cu m bags at 125,   so only 250 worth on a load.    Whats not to like.

 

I also sell seasoned from wood off local farms,  I have given up trying to buy decent processor size cord as I posted last week.  Paying 85 a ton plus VAT delivered that will make 1.5 cu m of logs after processing is not really any cheaper and the resale price and margin is lower as every idiot with a chainsaw is chopping prices for beer money.  My little processor single handed does about 6 cube a day on farm waste and 10 on 3m first thinnings,

 

The regulations will be tightened further in 2025 and possibly again in 2030 not that the latter will bother me  to much,  I will be long dead by then.  

 

You all might not see it this way but this is good news for the wood burning industry,

 

A

Interesting post thanks.

 

I have a question:

 

You say:   "The regulations will be tightened further in 2025 and possibly again in 2030 not that the latter will bother me  to much,  I will be long dead by then".

 

Exactly how,  would you suggest   "will the regulations will be tightened further in 2025 and possibly again in 2030" ?

 

(Hopefully you will still be alive).

 

 

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5 hours ago, arboriculturist said:

There is no sign of these massive industrial scale setups burning sub 20% woodchip any time soon!

Why should there be? Most of them will be specified for G30W30 and the power stations were accepting 45%mc.

 

Mind on the installations I worked on which were supposed to burn  G30W30 I never measured a sample drier than 40%.

 

The thing to remember that it's not dryness that decides how clean wood burns its the combination of the time the wood and offgases have to reside in the fire, the turbulence that causes mixing of the gases and the temperature the various species of chemical produced in reactions are subject to.

 

A big installation can satisfy all these ans still burn wet wood, a small domestic stove cannot.

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On 21/02/2020 at 21:05, Alycidon said:

Now people this is far from new and well overdue.

 

This is part of the Europe Wide Eco Design initive designed to reduce emissions and increase efficiency,  its been coming for at least 4 years.    There is also a proposed ban on high sulpher man made smokeless fuels but maybe thats been dropped as its not being kicked around today.

 

As a stove retailer I get called out 3 or 4 times a year to a stove that is not generating the expected level of heat,  this has ALWAYS been caused by users burning wood that is wet.    Even kiln dried wood that has not been in a kiln for long enough ( so dry on the outside but wet in the middle) is being dished out in the market.   I went out Boxing day evening to take some logs to a single mother who had been given a load of kiln dried for Xmas that was 40% in the middle.

 

This is good news for people in the firewood industry who do a good job and sell dry wood,  if you sell green wood as ready to burn you will be in trouble.   Future sales of green will need to be 3 cu m or more and sold as that and the evidence recorded.    At the end of the day its not that hard to get seasoned wood below 20%,   split it and store under cover in a barn that is open on at least 2 sides,  leave it for 8 months or so and there you are.  

 

I bring in kiln dried from Lithuania yes.   stacked in crates,  easy to handle, around 100 quid for the equiv of 1.6 cu m if loose, and no processing.   MC is under 5% from my supplier.   I get three stacked crates onto my trailer so thats 575/630 quids worth of wood depending on species of timber,    with seasoned I get 2 x 1.2 cu m bags at 125,   so only 250 worth on a load.    Whats not to like.

 

I also sell seasoned from wood off local farms,  I have given up trying to buy decent processor size cord as I posted last week.  Paying 85 a ton plus VAT delivered that will make 1.5 cu m of logs after processing is not really any cheaper and the resale price and margin is lower as every idiot with a chainsaw is chopping prices for beer money.  My little processor single handed does about 6 cube a day on farm waste and 10 on 3m first thinnings,

 

The regulations will be tightened further in 2025 and possibly again in 2030 not that the latter will bother me  to much,  I will be long dead by then.  

 

You all might not see it this way but this is good news for the wood burning industry,

 

A

 

I have a question  -  A very important question:

 

You say:   "The regulations will be tightened further in 2025 and possibly again in 2030 not that the latter will bother me  to much,  I will be long dead by then".

 

Exactly how,  would you suggest   "will the regulations will be tightened further in 2025 and possibly again in 2030" ?

Edited by arboriculturist

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