Jump to content
joshuak

Help! My Willow looks sick!

Recommended Posts

Hi everyone,

 

I purchased my home 4 years ago, and I've been told by a NY state licensed arborist that was working at my neighbors home, that my willow is some sort of miniature/dwarf, has reached full growth, and might be 30 years old.  Each warm season it has beautiful foliage, with no dots/markings on the top or underside of the leaves.  I just noticed (it is winter now) that the bark at the base of the tree is peeling, as well as along the leader of the whole tree. 

 

Here's a link to some images: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1kNcKdv5N92XMI1NRBqnZPBp67CULEPzj

 

You'll notice that the center leader of the tree is peeling all the way up.  Additionally, new smooth branches have some peeling as well as those little orange-ish dots.

 

Thoughts?  How do I help this tree?  Thank you in advance!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It looks like a fairly dry site, I don't know what kind of summers you have had over the last few years but willows are thirsty trees.

If it is just too dry for such a large tree then maybe not much you can do beyond mulching, unlikely you would be able to water a willow enough to keep it happy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Give it a really heavy reduction and if you’re feeling energetic kill all the grass underneath to the drip line and mulch.

 

Worth a shot, I’ve hammered over aged or sickly looking willows to good effect.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, EdwardC said:

The tree appears to have an unnatural taper where it enters the ground. The base, if what we are looking at is the base, of the tree appears decayed, and some of the branches appear to be dying.

 

Has the ground level been raised around the tree to create that level garden. This could have resulted in the death of the buried part of the stem and roots, which would lead to the decline and death of the crown of the tree. Maybe there's been a lot of soil compaction which could have a similar impact on the tree as burying it.

 

It can take 5 to 10 years for the effects of burying a tree or compacting the soil to become evident. Are you aware of any changes to the ground levels before you bought the house. If you're not sure, dig a few trial pits close to the tree to see if you can find any roots. If there are no roots in the top 600mm, (two feet), then its probably been buried. Your neighbours may also know about the history of the site in respect of level changes.

 

It is unlikely that if the tree has been buried that you could do anything to save it. Although I am prepeared to make a site visit and give advice based on what I can see during the visit, you might be better off getting a local arboricultral consultant to advise.

Were do you live Edward ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, EdwardC said:

Cumbria

Pretty decent of you to go to NY State for a free site visit bud . Top man !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, joshuak said:

Hi everyone,

 

I purchased my home 4 years ago, and I've been told by a NY state licensed arborist that was working at my neighbors home, that my willow is some sort of miniature/dwarf, has reached full growth, and might be 30 years old.  Each warm season it has beautiful foliage, with no dots/markings on the top or underside of the leaves.  I just noticed (it is winter now) that the bark at the base of the tree is peeling, as well as along the leader of the whole tree. 

 

Here's a link to some images: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1kNcKdv5N92XMI1NRBqnZPBp67CULEPzj

 

You'll notice that the center leader of the tree is peeling all the way up.  Additionally, new smooth branches have some peeling as well as those little orange-ish dots.

 

Thoughts?  How do I help this tree?  Thank you in advance!

Looks like potentially been damaged by works around the base of the tree some time ago, looks like the ground levels around it have changed, if there is too much soil over the root crown then the roots will be having a hard time breathing and they need oxygen, furthermore if the ground around it is compacted then the roots will also be struggling to take up water and nutrients. Willow like a lot of water generally. The grass looks pretty brown is it dead or dried out?

 

If you have the space, I would plant some more trees in your garden and then let the willow get on with it.

 

As others have mentioned mulching around the drip line and giving it a good trim will persuade it to boost itself and that might make him happier. A good mix of woodchip/compost well rotted should help it.

 

Improvements can take time with a tree as do things that go wrong with a tree, its not an overnight problem, it has probably been a problem for some time. Baring in mind the main living tissue is just under the bark and it looks like the heartwood is exposed. Potentially the bark is rotting because the original base height of the tree is under grass and soil. 

 

Rootzone area looks like priority to me. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Featured Adverts

About

Arbtalk.co.uk is a hub for the arboriculture industry in the UK.  
If you're just starting out and you need business, equipment, tech or training support you're in the right place.  If you've done it, made it, got a van load of oily t-shirts and have decided to give something back by sharing your knowledge or wisdom,  then you're welcome too.
If you would like to contribute to making this industry more effective and safe then welcome.
Just like a living tree, it'll always be a work in progress.
Please have a look around, sign up, share and contribute the best you have.

See you inside.

The Arbtalk Team

Follow us

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.