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Carl123

Structural engineer report

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I’ve recently had a tpo app rejected due to lack of evidence as the structural engineers report did not go into enough depth. My engineer seems to have given up so I was looking to submit myself. We have been asked to do a dig somewhere near the foundations and test the soil/water level. As the roots are clearly damaging the foundations of the property. I’m not expert in this field was wondering if anyone could give advice on what I need to do/say exactly. I have the impression permission won’t be a problem as long I send the right data.

 

Here’s a photo of the tree next to the house.

 

40268532-8563-4e90-953d-dc55dfb92747.jpg

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3 hours ago, Carl123 said:

We have been asked to do a dig somewhere near the foundations and test the soil/water level.

Are you being asked to demonstrate the level of the water table or the water content of the soil?

 

If it's the second the actual moisture in the clay matrix may what's being asked for. There are a few laboratories that'll provide this information but the samples need to be collected, packaged and correctly labelled. 

 

As Edward said, find out what is being asked for and then contact a lab to make sure you provide the correct samples.

 

Edit. re-reading your post I'm getting confused. Is the claim direct or indirect damage?

Edited by Gary Prentice

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That picture really makes me want to dig the gravel away and find out what's going on - seems bizarre that the tree would get so big a buttress after the house was built so was it cut back to dig foundation for an extension?

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Council have said that we should know what information to give them. As we ( the structural engineer are the experts) we can see some cracks in the render but I think the report wants to be aimed towards the soil shrinkage. I know the soil really sandy so doesn’t hold water. Don’t know if that’s a good or bad thing.

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Hang on  @Carl123.  The soil is really sandy...... An they are alleging soil ' shrinkage'....... ?   from a tree..... Errrr. K

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14 hours ago, Carl123 said:

I know the soil really sandy so doesn’t hold water. Don’t know if that’s a good or bad thing.

A very bad thing if you're claiming vegetation related subsidence as a reason to remove the tree.

Sandy soils don't shrink/swell the same as certain types of clay. 

 

EDIT - LA may be thinking that running sand may be the cause of movement, that's if the the cracking is actually due to foundation movement rather than natural settlement, the structure losing the moisture present when it was built etc 

 

Edited by Gary Prentice
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I get this a lot in London ' its always been there and must be causing our house to fall down ..."

 

Whilst I look at the shit 3x3 extension they put up 10 yrs ago with 500mm brick footings ........... 

 

K   :P

Edited by Khriss
( I usually prescribe a course of leeches applied liberally )
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15 minutes ago, Khriss said:

I get this a lot in London ' its always been there and must be causing our house to fall down ..."

 

Whilst I look at the shit 3x3 extension they put up 10 yrs ago with 500mm brick footings ........... 

 

K   :P

So you'll stand in court and blame the candyfloss construction instead of the tree? :D  Dares ya :aetsch:

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