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scotspine1

Twin Rope Hazard (Self Rescue)

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Anyone setting out to work in the tree using a twin line system needs to be aware of a potentially dangerous situation which could arise from using twin lines. 

 

Example -

 

A climber accidently cuts himself high up in the tree. He still has the ability to self rescue and descend out of the tree to seek urgent emergency first aid. 

 

As the bleeding climber descends - the trailing ends of his twin lines become entangled beneath him midway through the descent severely restricting his progress to the ground, trapping him at this point. 

 

In this scenario the climber could bleed out. 

 

 

 

.

 

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Anyone setting out to work in the tree using a twin line system needs to be aware of a potentially dangerous situation which could arise from using twin lines. 
 
Example -
 
A climber accidently cuts himself high up in the tree. He still has the ability to self rescue and descend out of the tree to seek urgent emergency first aid. 
 
As the bleeding climber descends - the trailing ends of his twin lines become entangled beneath him midway through the descent severely restricting his progress to the ground, trapping him at this point. 
 
In this scenario the climber could bleed out. 
 
 
 
.
 
In that or any self rescue scenario, it it was me using 2 full lines, id immediately ditch the second line and decend normally. Ffs its an emergency! Any good?
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Was talking about this at work today. Also though that a second line, used more like a lanyard with a tail long enough to decent the tree coiled in a small bag on harness a workable solution?

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15 minutes ago, billpierce said:

In that or any self rescue scenario, it it was me using 2 full lines, id immediately ditch the second line and decend normally. 

 

If the bleeding climber unclips one of his twin lines and descends on a single line, the trailing ends of his ropes still have the ability to become entangled, they've been sitting together (possibly twisted) while he worked in the tree. 

 

.

 

 

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If the bleeding climber unclips one of his twin lines and descends on a single line, the trailing ends of his ropes still have the ability to become entangled, they've been sitting together while he worked in the tree. 
 
.
 
 
God this whole things a nightmare

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12 minutes ago, billpierce said:
27 minutes ago, scotspine1 said:
Anyone setting out to work in the tree using a twin line system needs to be aware of a potentially dangerous situation which could arise from using twin lines. 
 
Example -
 
A climber accidently cuts himself high up in the tree. He still has the ability to self rescue and descend out of the tree to seek urgent emergency first aid. 
 
As the bleeding climber descends - the trailing ends of his twin lines become entangled beneath him midway through the descent severely restricting his progress to the ground, trapping him at this point. 
 
In this scenario the climber could bleed out. 
 
 
 
.
 

Read more  

In that or any self rescue scenario, it it was me using 2 full lines, id immediately ditch the second line and decend normally. Ffs its an emergency! Any good?

This.

 

Been climbing on ‘two ropes’ since 2015 (client requirement) can’t think of a single time that my poor rope management resulted in them all getting tangled together..... sorry.

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47 minutes ago, scotspine1 said:

 

If the bleeding climber unclips one of his twin lines and descends on a single line, the trailing ends of his ropes still have the ability to become entangled, they've been sitting together while he worked in the tree. 

 

.

 

 

2 ropes.... 2 rope bags.

 

Yes, I’m that opulent.

Edited by Bolt
2 bags..... A biggish bag and a littler bag

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11 minutes ago, Bolt said:

This.

 

Been climbing on ‘two ropes’ since 2015 (client requirement) can’t think of a single time that my poor rope management resulted in them all getting tangled together..... sorry.

 

That's not what you said in the two rope update thread:

 

"Learning on the classic 3 knot system means that I can still cut any tree I come across with nothing more than a longish rope, a shortish rope and a harness.

 

I look at the complexity of all this ....

 

CD5D75A3-386A-4532-9A3A-F1EBB9F4C6A9.thumb.jpeg.056300a27b876cafdf0710f005ecd1b8.jpeg

 

and I just don’t think I could be arsed."

 

So are you using two full length climbing lines? or a full length rope and a 'shortish rope'? if you're using a shortish rope this contravenes the new industry code of practice as both ropes have to reach the ground. 

 

.

 

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9 minutes ago, Bolt said:

2 ropes.... 2 rope bags.

 

Yes, I’m that opulent.

 

So your groundie is constantly tending, managing and feeding the slack of your two trailing ends into your ropebags while you move around and up and down the tree? if so he's constantly moving into the drop zone to carry this out. 

 

How is that safe? 

 

 

.

 

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