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Acerforestry

Biochar and charcoal supply / demand

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Since I'm now over the half century and still in the woods hand cutting at least some of the time, my attention getting drawn (for very necessary reasons) to other ways of supplementing my income in addition to shoving chestnut trees over all day. Have many other on here had much financial success in commercial production of either or both, charcoal and bio char. I have access to considerable amounts of waste wood that is suitable for both applications, and I like the general ethos. Also have somewhere to site a decent sized kiln. Is this something of a road to nowhere or worth a shot, thoughts on this please

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There seems to be a big thing about spreading bio char on farm fields. I personally think it is pure coblers but it maybe an avenue to investigate.

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43 minutes ago, markieg31 said:

There seems to be a big thing about spreading bio char on farm fields. I personally think it is pure coblers but it maybe an avenue to investigate.

I think depends on if you have Alkaline or acidic soil types .

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Terrra preta is interesting dunno if thats means it works in the UK though:

 

EN.WIKIPEDIA.ORG

 

Biochar or charcoal fines waste is same as charcoal but more expensive, for rich hippies? 😀

 

Look at the price of the stuff......

 

WWW.CARBONGOLD.COM

Discover the benefits of Biochar for your business or garden. ✓100% Organic ✓Peat-Free ✓Fast Delivery ✓Scientifically...

 

Not bad for a waste product from charcoal making?

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1 hour ago, Stubby said:

I think depends on if you have Alkaline or acidic soil types .

Yes, I think its proved most effective on acid soils. Also good for water retention. There was a good paper shared on here a few years ago. Thought I had it bookmarked but  cant find it but will have another look.

 

Edit. This was one of the links

WWW.SCIENCEDAILY.COM

Scientists believe that biochar, the partially burned remains of plants, has been used as fertilizer for at least 2,000 years in...

 

Edited by Woodworks
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Ok some interesting points - I did note that biochar appears to be quite a buzzword, I was told by the bloke who ran the hedge laying course I was on the other week that there is a charcoal festival in Sussex in the summer, but damned if I could find any info. 

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Charfest in Dorset? Men with beards gather and share stories of getting taxpayers to fund economically unviable things.

People don't want to buy biochar. They want to buy scratchcards.

Edited by AHPP
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7 minutes ago, Acerforestry said:

Ok some interesting points - I did note that biochar appears to be quite a buzzword, I was told by the bloke who ran the hedge laying course I was on the other week that there is a charcoal festival in Sussex in the summer, but damned if I could find any info. 

Charfest is what you are after. Think it's held on Alan Walters patch at least it was the year I went

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I don't think it is worth doing unless you have a decent use of the heat as well, ideally you would make it with pyrolysis/gasification and capture the gasses. 
There is a whole load of money going into the science of biochar but it is yet to be practically implemented at scale and the last study I read claimed there was differences in how long it lasts in the soil if produced at different temperatures. So it would be a pity to invest in kit and then have it not be the right kit to make a good product.I don't think it is worth doing unless you have a decent use of the heat as well, ideally you would make it with pyrolysis/gasification and capture the gasses. 
There is a whole load of money going into the science of biochar but it is yet to be practically implemented at scale and the last study I read claimed there was differences in how long it lasts in the soil if produced at different temperatures. So it would be a pity to invest in kit and then have it not be the right kit to make a good product.

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