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the village idiot

An Idiot's guide to Ancient Woodland management

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4 minutes ago, the village idiot said:

Oh, that's good!?

 

Been waiting 23 years for an opportunity to wheel out that particular atrocity.

 

Thanks.

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An update on our mysterious spider friend from Juliet.

 

Graham and Steve,

So in one hour this is the response ... (lots of likes and wow faces!!).  This is a very good find and I will submit it as a record.  Do you have an approximate grid ref and if you can pinpoint the site, I can check it out at another time of year and you can keep your eyes out for more!!

The general consensus is that it is one of two Meta (cave spider) species - either species would be a good find.  The books say microscopic examination of genitalia is necessary to confirm identification.  And like I thought the black colour is misleading and masking some of the true patterning.  But ...

I’m definitely leaning towards Meta bourneti, the Nationally Scarce (a Red Data Book definition) one .... for the following reasons:

·         Although both similar habitat, my geek spider book specifically says “it has been recorded from ancient woodland sites where it may be associated with large, ancient trees with hollow trunks. .... also recorded from the interior of abandoned WW2 pillboxes and burial vaults in Highgate Cemetery, London, and also underground culverts and inspection chambers.”  It has been recorded at Minsmere.

·         Distribution map shows Suffolk being a stronghold for this species whilst the other one is not recorded in Suffolk.

 

Keep interesting finds coming with good pics showing some diagnostic features!

The facebook phone a friend world is amazing for helping with this kind of stuff now.  Scroll down for comments.

Juliet

 

 

thumbnail?appId=YMailNorrinLaunch&downloadWhenThumbnailFails=true&pid=4

 

 

thumbnail?appId=YMailNorrinLaunch&downloadWhenThumbnailFails=true&pid=2

 

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Brilliant thread of pictures and words. I've seen some of your posts over the years VI in various sections here which I always enjoyed, so its great to have a dedicated go-to thread. It's an interesting topic for me as well, as I do similar here in Ireland at the weekends, working through an ancient lakeside woodland that has been neglected for decades (Yes this is just a hobby activity for me, but a rewarding one). My bread and butter 9-5 backround is in the geology world, so when it comes to woodland management I have been learning on the job. Though self guided as it has been for me, its reasurring to see similar aspects in this thread recreated, so I wasn't far out in my own intuitive way. The ride widening formula you apply is fascinating, and has given me inspiration for future work here. I'm really excited to see how that progresses once the growth takes focus again. For the mean time I look forward to the next installment. All the best.

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14 minutes ago, rowan lee said:

Brilliant thread of pictures and words. I've seen some of your posts over the years VI in various sections here which I always enjoyed, so its great to have a dedicated go-to thread. It's an interesting topic for me as well, as I do similar here in Ireland at the weekends, working through an ancient lakeside woodland that has been neglected for decades (Yes this is just a hobby activity for me, but a rewarding one). My bread and butter 9-5 backround is in the geology world, so when it comes to woodland management I have been learning on the job. Though self guided as it has been for me, its reasurring to see similar aspects in this thread recreated, so I wasn't far out in my own intuitive way. The ride widening formula you apply is fascinating, and has given me inspiration for future work here. I'm really excited to see how that progresses once the growth takes focus again. For the mean time I look forward to the next installment. All the best.

Thanks very much rowan. I'm chuffed there are still some of you checking in with what has become a rather monster thread!

 

I remember seeing some pictures of your woody work in the past. I think it's great that you choose to spend some of your free time doing this. Don't hold back from putting some pictures up on this thread, I'm sure we'd all like to see how you are getting on.

 

I wonder if, with your geology knowledge, you might be able to help me out when I eventually get around to soils?

They are arguably the most important constituent of any woodland, but not my strong point when it comes to knowledge. Does your work extend to soils or is it mainly concerned with what lies beneath?

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My area of experience is limited to base metal (zinc, lead, copper) exploration typically in a Limestone environments, but you never know, you can try me anytime with questions, and there are plenty of academic types to bounce off round here. [email protected] is checked on a daily basis if you need anything. Pending on your local area, the bedrock could be well and truly buried under 10's or 100's of meters of glacial sediments, which in itself is an entire specially (quaternary geology).

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22 hours ago, the village idiot said:

An update on our mysterious spider friend from Juliet.

 

Graham and Steve,

So in one hour this is the response ... (lots of likes and wow faces!!).  This is a very good find and I will submit it as a record.  Do you have an approximate grid ref and if you can pinpoint the site, I can check it out at another time of year and you can keep your eyes out for more!!

The general consensus is that it is one of two Meta (cave spider) species - either species would be a good find.  The books say microscopic examination of genitalia is necessary to confirm identification.  And like I thought the black colour is misleading and masking some of the true patterning.  But ...

I’m definitely leaning towards Meta bourneti, the Nationally Scarce (a Red Data Book definition) one .... for the following reasons:

·         Although both similar habitat, my geek spider book specifically says “it has been recorded from ancient woodland sites where it may be associated with large, ancient trees with hollow trunks. .... also recorded from the interior of abandoned WW2 pillboxes and burial vaults in Highgate Cemetery, London, and also underground culverts and inspection chambers.”  It has been recorded at Minsmere.

·         Distribution map shows Suffolk being a stronghold for this species whilst the other one is not recorded in Suffolk.

 

Keep interesting finds coming with good pics showing some diagnostic features!

The facebook phone a friend world is amazing for helping with this kind of stuff now.  Scroll down for comments.

Juliet

 

 

thumbnail?appId=YMailNorrinLaunch&downloadWhenThumbnailFails=true&pid=4

 

 

thumbnail?appId=YMailNorrinLaunch&downloadWhenThumbnailFails=true&pid=2

 

raw?appid=YMailNorrinLaunch&ymreqid=c73d7eb9-bcc0-56bc-1cfd-060000010300&token=zitEzqOML3j84e6ealFTT5U7-km5qEQF52lp7AcCuBbHdXoJBA_PUdDiOgTc6Jn8pRe0kMjnhVu-q-T5PgweGJMvvgMqLxde2ZNyLgajEX3ReYCl1A62Qn7BCSxGmviC

 

 

 

 

 

 

Only problem now  is that you'll be banned from working within half a mile of where you found it, have to fill in loads of forms and a thirty page method statement as to how you can continue  forestry operations without affecting it. 

 

Next thing you know you'll be spending thousands creating a new home, complete with sauna and wide screen cinema screens. :lol: 

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1 hour ago, Gary Prentice said:

Only problem now  is that you'll be banned from working within half a mile of where you found it, have to fill in loads of forms and a thirty page method statement as to how you can continue  forestry operations without affecting it.

On a serious note this does concern me with my bits of woodland. We have a few rare things and people want us to record them but we're concerned what that would mean for future management.

 

I'm also think quite a few rare things are actually fairly common, such as these cave spiders. People just don't notice them.

 

Going back to this spider, you can lighten the image and get a better feel of it's true colour. As for biting, if you're going to microscopically examine its genitalia then you can't blame it for biting!

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On a serious note this does concern me with my bits of woodland. We have a few rare things and people want us to record them but we're concerned what that would mean for future management.
 
I'm also think quite a few rare things are actually fairly common, such as these cave spiders. People just don't notice them.
 
Going back to this spider, you can lighten the image and get a better feel of it's true colour. As for biting, if you're going to microscopically examine its genitalia then you can't blame it for biting!
We're the same with this and have decided not to let the wildlife trust in as a consequence. If the wildlife is there it's because of or not impacted by the way the woods are used and so will remain, however we may be negatively I.oacted on how we use it
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7 hours ago, Paul in the woods said:

On a serious note this does concern me with my bits of woodland. We have a few rare things and people want us to record them but we're concerned what that would mean for future management.

 

I'm also think quite a few rare things are actually fairly common, such as these cave spiders. People just don't notice them.

 

Going back to this spider, you can lighten the image and get a better feel of it's true colour. As for biting, if you're going to microscopically examine its genitalia then you can't blame it for biting!

Sounds a reasonable reaction to sometimes overly zealous restraints by others with their own agendas. 

 

Slightly different note but on one development site I had some involvement with the original developer was forced to construct a large brick building (bigger than a double garage) to 'rehouse' some bats that 'may' have been residing in some old wooden buildings that were being demo-ed.

 

Long story short, the original developer went bust, long delays before another firm started the build. The new bat building has now been up for about twelves years and last I heard there are still no indications that any passing bat has taken a fancy to the pied-a-terre. 

 

 

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