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I have one living in my freshly cut log pile ( am wanting to stack these for the year so toad will be homeless soon)

 

 

Couple of questions, does aonyone else have interesting wildlife in their wood piles? (we also had a wood wasp the other year too -huge ad scary looking)

 

Second question, has anyone left any wood piles to atract wildlife and any tips like just throw them in a pile, stack tem, stack them on pallets or bricks or rocks? part bury them?

 

(Mr Toad eats slugs, slugs eat my vegies, mr Toad is good)

 

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3 hours ago, Steven P said:

I have one living in my freshly cut log pile ( am wanting to stack these for the year so toad will be homeless soon)

 

 

Couple of questions, does aonyone else have interesting wildlife in their wood piles? (we also had a wood wasp the other year too -huge ad scary looking)

 

Second question, has anyone left any wood piles to atract wildlife and any tips like just throw them in a pile, stack tem, stack them on pallets or bricks or rocks? part bury them?

 

(Mr Toad eats slugs, slugs eat my vegies, mr Toad is good)

 

I removed two toads from a pile of clogs I was splitting. Could easily have killed them as I never knew they where there and what a fleg they gave me. :D 

 

After reading your post I should have moved them to my Veg patch and not the small forested area at the back of the house. 

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Two winters ago I took to wearing gloves all the time due to the numbers of hibernating wasps.

I carefully move hibernating butterflies to a cage of logs not due to be disturbed any time soon but I didn't find a single specimen last winter; very sad.

My IBCs contain numerous Field Mouse nests which is great.

Found last spring's robin's nest (I'd guess) only this afternoon.

 

 

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All the deadwood from my Oak field margins is cut and stacked as bug burrows, I call them cold bonfires as they eventually decay to nothing. This time of the year I am always taking toads, frogs and newts out of the chlorinated swimming pool water and transferring them to a small natural pond. As a sideways comment on nature the charming grey squirrels have just eaten through the leadwork on the chimneys of my sons house.

lead damage.jpeg

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Got loads of toads this year seem more than ever.I always leave log piles in the woods where i can and they create a home for lots of wildlife,fascinating what you find when you rummage through.

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All the deadwood from my Oak field margins is cut and stacked as bug burrows, I call them cold bonfires as they eventually decay to nothing. This time of the year I am always taking toads, frogs and newts out of the chlorinated swimming pool water and transferring them to a small natural pond. As a sideways comment on nature the charming grey squirrels have just eaten through the leadwork on the chimneys of my sons house.
1944538666_leaddamage.jpeg.9acb5baffdd31140beba78671738a553.jpeg

Sneaky little sods!!! I’d never of thought squirrels would av took a fancy to lead of all things?! To be hoped your lad don’t find them in time festering somewhere internally because they’ve snuffed it from lead poisoning!
🤢🤮

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Found 2 frogs/toads in this pile I was doing yesterday, they were lucky I spotted them before them got squashed o.O

The logs had been there for many years, and were really well stuck together, took a fair bit of effort just to separate them.

 

 

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DSCN2260x.thumb.jpg.bc753b6051c99b80b609453067264487.jpg

 

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Massive problem with toads is they look like bark.

 

Had a mouse nest in the garage logs one year - nice and cosy and dry for them (no food in the garage so it was just bed for the) -mice were long gone by the time I got to it.

 

 

 

 

Squirrels and seeing the lead flashing - they gnawed through the wheelie bin ld and starting living in it one year, I tipped it up so the squirrel cold get out then took it in the garage to patc hit with mesh and fibre glass, next day  got a text "The squirell is in the bin" - sneaky thng must have been sat in the there hiding and watching - and then high as a kite all morning from th fumes. Kind of glad it did keep still rather than jumpng out. I ddn't have the heart to let the bin men take it with them.

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wasps, a lot of wasps.  I average 3 per m3.  I've seen ne of my local wood peckers in my shed...he is either useless, or fat...i think its the former. Also one mose nest.

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On the subject of hibernating wasps;  I thought it was queens that hibernated so they could create colonies in the spring but many of the winter log dwellers are wingless.   What's going on there?

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