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The realities of hand cutting

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I’d say do it for a year, then the rest of your life will seem easy.


Very true wise words, I did steep ground felling and winching for 5 years. Driving 2-3 hours a day to sites, and now it’s over, life is a doddle. And I’m farming of all things

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I used to play cricket with a guy who was a dairyman for a good few years, up at silly o’clock, stuck in a freezing, shitty parlour every day and everything else that job entails.

 

Then he jacked it in and became a postman, he said he laughed hearing the other posties moaning about their lot, every day was a breeze for him after what he was doing before.

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Nice to see appreciation of that occupation Mick.  My cousin's just stopped dairy farming at the age of 73 having started in 1968 on the same farm.  Physically he's about broken; he was ambulanced to A&E straight from the parlour twice in the later years, once unconscious.

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1 hour ago, Rough Hewn said:

This is a 45 degree muddy slope. Dragging brash and logs down is easy. It's the slog back up.
IMG_8943.jpg
It's killing me. emoji51.png

Bloody hell rough have you got yourself a proper job ? instead of dossing about every day !

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1 hour ago, Rough Hewn said:

This is a 45 degree muddy slope. Dragging brash and logs down is easy. It's the slog back up.
IMG_8943.jpg
It's killing me. emoji51.png

Jesus wept.

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12 hours ago, nepia said:

Nice to see appreciation of that occupation Mick.  My cousin's just stopped dairy farming at the age of 73 having started in 1968 on the same farm.  Physically he's about broken; he was ambulanced to A&E straight from the parlour twice in the later years, once unconscious.

As a younger man I lived with my family (dad was a tractor driver) across the yard from the dairyman’s tied cottage.

 

At around 5 every morning I’d lie in my warm bed and listen as he’d start his tractor to make the 1.5 mile drive along the farm drive to the parlour. Rain, ice, wind whatever.

His fingers were always cracked and damaged by the wet and cold and chemicals.

 

 

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12 hours ago, Rough Hewn said:


Yeah, but for some strange reason,
I absolutely love it.
emoji6.pngemoji106.png

Not many people possess enough grit to work on a bank like that.

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