Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Fieldarcher

Injury forces a change of mediums

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, stuckinthemud said:

Looks like its a lot more dense than the fallow I use. Whats the longest inch wide strip do you think you could get from one?

Am I right in saying, this would make it better for intricate carving?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Looks like its a lot more dense than the fallow I use. Whats the longest inch wide strip do you think you could get from one?


This type of carving is new to me but to answer you’re question then I would say 4 inches from this set . The softer core is quite random and leaves variable wall thicknesses . I have been working toward matching what I carve to what the section will allow. The small dragon was carved around the core . The core was exposed at his belly and worked well with the colour change in highlighting this ringed feature. Another example was the dragon with the wing . This was carved from an upside down section just at the place where a point branches off . The slight natural webbing was what I carved the wing from . I’ve had the help of my wife in trying to whiten the darker section but without much success. Still learning and I’m going up north next month to get more antler and hopefully bigger ones that I can use in creating some very one off sheath knives .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Am I right in saying, this would make it better for intricate carving?


Hi Paul .
The density is pretty much the same all the way down to the core which is soft , porous and discoloured. The points seem to be denser and whiter . The level of detail is really down to how small and sharp the tools are .
Derek
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On fallow deer antler, the pith runs to within 1 or 1.5mm of the surface of the palms, the pith is not only porous it goes so soft in water you can cut it out with a spoon. Biggest advantage of working the palmate section is it becomes plastic with steam. This allowed me to inlay it in long strips into the compound curves of a crossbow stock.

  The workable thickness of the rolls is slightly thicker but the stems are not plastic with steam. Unfortunately even the tips of the tines have a workable thickness of only maybe 3mm

 

Edited by stuckinthemud

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On fallow deer antler, the pith runs to within 1 or 1.5mm of the surface of the palms, the pith is not only porous it goes so soft in water you can cut it out with a spoon. Biggest advantage of working the palmate section is it becomes plastic with steam. This allowed me to inlay it in long strips into the compound curves of a crossbow stock.
  The workable thickness of the rolls is slightly thicker but the stems are not plastic with steam. Unfortunately even the tips of the tines have a workable thickness of only maybe 3mm
 


A friend used to heat it to shape but I’ve not needed to do that yet . I’m an archer myself so appreciate what you are doing . My next project with antler is some carved handles for sheath knives .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Featured Adverts

About

Arbtalk.co.uk is a hub for the arboriculture industry in the UK.  
If you're just starting out and you need business, equipment, tech or training support you're in the right place.  If you've done it, made it, got a van load of oily t-shirts and have decided to give something back by sharing your knowledge or wisdom,  then you're welcome too.
If you would like to contribute to making this industry more effective and safe then welcome.
Just like a living tree, it'll always be a work in progress.
Please have a look around, sign up, share and contribute the best you have.

See you inside.

The Arbtalk Team

Follow us

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.