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RobInNorfolk

Farm 2000 boilers

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Hi - any thoughts on the Farm 2000 boilers? They look simple and robust.

 

Would be adding to an oil fired system. The plumber recommends it heats the DHW tank and then offloads to the central heating.

 

He doesn’t think an accumulator tank is a good idea because the central heating radiator and pipe work system is ancient (1950s) and has a big volume of water in it which would soon use all the heat in an accumulator.

 

It’s a big house with thick brick walls but not much insulation. We keep it fairly cool in winter and the aim is just to use less oil.

 

Would be grateful for any advice.

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46 minutes ago, RobInNorfolk said:

 

Hi - any thoughts on the Farm 2000 boilers? They look simple and robust.

Yes they are very simple compared with the boilers I used to work with.

46 minutes ago, RobInNorfolk said:

 

Would be adding to an oil fired system. The plumber recommends it heats the DHW tank and then offloads to the central heating.

 

He doesn’t think an accumulator tank is a good idea because the central heating radiator and pipe work system is ancient (1950s) and has a big volume of water in it which would soon use all the heat in an accumulator.

 

It’s a big house with thick brick walls but not much insulation. We keep it fairly cool in winter and the aim is just to use less oil.

 

Would be grateful for any advice.

 

Unless things have changed they are batch loaded, i.e. you load them, light them, burn out the load and then rake out the ashes next day and start again, the accumulator absorbs excess heat from the boiler that the central heating doesn't call for and then as the fire dies down continues to satisfy the central heating until you light it again,. So is your plumber just expecting the oil burner to cut in as the fire dies down (saves the cost of the accumulator) or are you going to hot stoke it continually during the day? Unless they have now got refractory fireboxes I would expect a bit of smoke when you reload, also will it have an induced draught fan or a very tall chimney?

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Unless things have changed they are batch loaded, i.e. you load them, light them, burn out the load and then rake out the ashes next day and start again, the accumulator absorbs excess heat from the boiler that the central heating doesn't call for and then as the fire dies down continues to satisfy the central heating until you light it again,. So is your plumber just expecting the oil burner to cut in as the fire dies down (saves the cost of the accumulator) or are you going to hot stoke it continually during the day? Unless they have now got refractory fireboxes I would expect a bit of smoke when you reload, also will it have an induced draught fan or a very tall chimney?


I think the plumber isn’t quite sure what to do - I am going to shop around for advice and experience before doing anything. I think the accumulator is important especially in summer when burning wood just for hot water.

We probably won’t stoke continuously. Quite often there’s no-one of stoking age around - hence integrating with the oil system.

For chimney that’s also still to decide. It’s near a listed building so probably induced draft.

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Hi - any thoughts on the Farm 2000 boilers? They look simple and robust.
 
Would be adding to an oil fired system. The plumber recommends it heats the DHW tank and then offloads to the central heating.
 
He doesn’t think an accumulator tank is a good idea because the central heating radiator and pipe work system is ancient (1950s) and has a big volume of water in it which would soon use all the heat in an accumulator.
 
It’s a big house with thick brick walls but not much insulation. We keep it fairly cool in winter and the aim is just to use less oil.
 
Would be grateful for any advice.

I have been running a Ht70 for about 6 years, i would think you will be much better off with an accumulator, it will allow you greater flexibility in terms of loading times, it will also allow you to run the boiler hard, ensures max efficiency and clean inside, it uses plenty of timber, nice simple technology, plenty of manual labour to chop, stack and load, if you had a good supply of cheap dry timber then this would make it easier, i imagine it would boil system which had insufficient volume of water very easily, thing is once you have loaded it you want to let it go and absorb all the energy released into the tank, it will sense when it’s upto temp and then the fan turns off but slumbering is not so good as you may get smoke and tar build up, mine can take 11 days to cool down in the warm weather, prob 3-4 days in winter, hope that helps
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So does the oil boiler heat the accumulator or do the two systems meet “after” the accumulator, with a thermostat calling on the accumulator first and the oil second?

 

Really appreciate the responses, thanks.

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Where are you based? 

 

What size oil boiler is currently fiited, what kw size is the F2000?

 

If no one is there to stokeoften then def go buffer tank.

 

many didn’t fit buffers and the boiler cuts in and out as the 3000 litre or so cools and heats. You will find efficiencies drop big time doing this, the best way to use them is hard and fast, flat out and bank the heat. 

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I'd also have to ask, are you in a smoke control area ?.

As they were only ever approved for smokeless areas if burning just straw bales.

 

https://www.farm2000.co.uk/accumulators-chimneys/

 

Which has a recommended size chart, with a general rule of a minimum being 50 litre per Kw.

If you have the space the bigger the better as you can burn like crazy and it stays hot for days, the tanks are that well insulated it can stay hot for up to a week.

 

I've currently got a 25kw Angus Super with a 1500 litre tank, even then I wish it was much larger.

Eventually I will be aiming for 5000 litres and a larger more automated boiler.

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Automation costs though.

 

the beauty of f2000’s is their simplicity 

 

if if you do get one get a fabricator to weld some cross bars on the door. They have cut back on steel usage and the door will warp eventually which is a pig to sort.

 

also taller the flue the better. Don’t go tho king that they won’t smoke either - they will! Fuel is key, get it wrong and it’s awful!

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