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corylus

Storing willow stobs

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Because of our recent floods I have to carry out quite a bit of riverbank work. 

I have a willowy island to remove but also have a couple of areas of bank to repair that I intend to plant with these ‘harvested’ willow stobs. The initial works (next week or two) will be cutting the willow then removing said island. The bank repairs will be done toward the end of winter and then planted. 

How (if it’s indeed possible) should I store the willow stobs for that length of time?

Ta in advance....

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Can’t help with question I’m afraid but interested to know what a stob is.

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Guess it's another word for a set? (Cutting of willow etc. to replant by pushing into the ground).

 

To try and answer the OP's question, I think you'll struggle to keep em that long. You can store them for a few days somewhere damp and cool or even heel them in in damp sand, but for that length of time they'll probably be rooting and you'll damage the roots when you pull them out again.

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Cut bits of willow tree are so easy to come by that I wouldn't stress yourself trying to store material cut now.  When the time comes to stick cuttings in the ground just ask local tree guys or on here and you'll source what you want with not problem.

 

If you're determined to use what you have available now put them in the ground to root and harvest cuttings from them in late winter 😊

Edited by nepia
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3 hours ago, AHPP said:

Can’t help with question I’m afraid but interested to know what a stob is.

I always thought it was a scotish word for stake

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stob
/stɒb/
noun
DIALECTSCOTTISH
 
  1. a broken branch or a stump.
    "old roots and stobs and crackling leaves"
    • a stake used for fencing.
       
       
       
       
      Round here in Co Antrim I have heard locals refer to fence posts as "paling stabs"
Edited by difflock
additional detail

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Marcus the first time I came across the term it was used for a hot and cold device for creosoting stakes, it was marketed as The Stobster. The broken branch usage seems close to stub.

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To me a stob is a strainer, or sometimes just fenceposts in general

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Cheers peeps for the replies.

I wasn’t hopeful that I could store that long. I can get willow stobs (sorry I shouldn’t have used such a ‘local’ term but I’ve always known short lengths of wood etches that) fairly  easily but these are very close to where I want to replant, lovely and straight, of local provenance and are coming out anyway.

Oh well plan B.....

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