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Chip66

Harness advice- Top heavy body!

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On 08/08/2019 at 11:14, Chip66 said:

I had to pull quite hard on the rope to stay upright. If I relaxed my body it just wanted to go horizontal!

If I'm understanding you correctly, I think this might be more to do with core strength than the actual harness. And I'm not be derogatory before anyone starts. 

 

Some harnesses with low points of attachment seem to require a bit more input on the part of the user to maintain an upright posture and allow you to easily tip feet up if you just relax yourself. (you won't fall out of a correctly adjusted harness - don't worry)

 

I'd encourage you to persevere with what you've got, if that's what you have got, because when you start climbing everything feels odd anyway, the whole experience, so the quicker you get used to your gear the better. Then you can start to focus on the 1001 other things that you have to do and are going on around you.

 

Good luck.

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3 hours ago, Stubby said:

Nice to know that your airway is open as you slip out of your saddle heading for the deck 😁

Statistically Mr Stubby, unconscious people break fewer bones on impact- is why drunk drivers tend to walk away from car smashes. K

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7 hours ago, Khriss said:

@Paul Tomo actually, if yr unconscious, head tipped back means yr airway opens. So work position harness are safer than full body in that regard. K

 

7 hours ago, Khriss said:

@Paul Tomo actually, if yr unconscious, head tipped back means yr airway opens. So work position harness are safer than full body in that regard. K

I saw an article on YouTube with some Teufelberger guy say you want the tree motion evo lower than waist height more on the lower hips to protect the lower part of your back when working in the harness, your going to fall out if you was to go upside down. 

 

The harness needs to be to be round your waistline I would say.

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52 minutes ago, Paul Tomo said:

 

I saw an article on YouTube with some Teufelberger guy say you want the tree motion evo lower than waist height more on the lower hips to protect the lower part of your back when working in the harness, your going to fall out if you was to go upside down. 

 

The harness needs to be to be round your waistline I would say.

And a personal lanyard attached to your knob . 🙂

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Steady now! Mr Stubby! I am bit slender an on diving found the weights belt slipping off my hips. So I actually have the harness slacker n make sure I ' sit in' it in work positioning. Not have it crimped to me. K

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2 hours ago, Paul Tomo said:

 

I saw an article on YouTube with some Teufelberger guy say you want the tree motion evo lower than waist height more on the lower hips to protect the lower part of your back when working in the harness, your going to fall out if you was to go upside down. 

 

The harness needs to be to be round your waistline I would say.

Thats rubbish Tomo. It's got to fit, like a trouser belt with loops fr yr legs. Try sliding loops further down yr thighs to balance. It'll sit better. K

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3 hours ago, Stubby said:

And a personal lanyard attached to your knob . 🙂

Not sure what you mean stubby please be more clear in what you are saying.

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1 hour ago, Khriss said:

Thats rubbish Tomo. It's got to fit, like a trouser belt with loops fr yr legs. Try sliding loops further down yr thighs to balance. It'll sit better. K

Like I said the harness should fit tight around your waist , I hope you mean the video I saw is rubbish. The video is called how to adjust a treeMotion evo with John trenchard, It’s on YouTube. 

 

I use the treeMotion evo and I have it tight around my waist and not how he says. 

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I find the tree motion sits best with the buckle probably a little below the height of my pelvis. So most of the padding is below the waist but you can't slip out of it. 

My first week on the job for a company I was using an Avao and almost packed it in it caused my so much pain. So many things wrong with that harness for me. Everyone's different, try another harness and see how you get on. 

As said though, sounds like you might just need to stick at it until your core muscles get adapt though. 

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