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Has anyone got a link to a good guide to identify and management of trees with Ash die back on roadside, I'm finding a lot of contradiction in articles, some are saying remove some say leave to see what happens but one of our clients wants to formulate a bit of a management plan.

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WWW.TREECOUNCIL.ORG.UK plus lots of stuff on FC website...albeit more general.
Thanks Paul
That's about the best put together report I have seen, definitely something more local authority management need to be looking at as far to many are covering there ears pretending it's not a problem and it'll sort itself out without impacting on the budgets. Sadly I can't see this being the case as I just have to look up as I drive many roads around us to see a problem unfolding.
Now what we need is a best practice guide to working on these trees safely for both professionals within the industry and Landowners as a highways officer I spoke to admitted they were going to try and push landowners to deal with dead trees themselves which I predict will lead to problems and sadly deaths from farmers taking on something they are under equipped and inexperienced in doing.
I've already lost one friend to a tree this year and certainly don't want to hear of any more.

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FISA (UK), by virtue of one of their members having a related accident, have issued some guidance relating to tree felling operations (see attached.)

We are currently working up some guidance for aerial works...which generally says 'use a MEWP' where there's any concerns about tree safety / wood integrity (something we are trying to get further 'scientific' information about from FERA/DEFRA/FC but, anecdotally, it would appear the disease makes an already fairly brittle tree potentially even more so.)

 

 

Safety Guidance Note - Felling dead ash - April 2018.pdf

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FISA (UK), by virtue of one of their members having a related accident, have issued some guidance relating to tree felling operations (see attached.)
We are currently working up some guidance for aerial works...which generally says 'use a MEWP' where there's any concerns about tree safety / wood integrity (something we are trying to get further 'scientific' information about from FERA/DEFRA/FC but, anecdotally, it would appear the disease makes an already fairly brittle tree potentially even more so.)
 
 
Safety Guidance Note - Felling dead ash - April 2018.pdf
Thanks again Paul, I've forwarded that on to a couple of our country estate clients who have there own lads doing bits of felling still, I'll be interested once you've got the aerial guide together as I'll work it into a toolbox talk for my lads and subbies and unashamedly use the info towards marketing ourselves with having our own mewps to deal with the problem trees.

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It's really rare to see a healthy ash up here. When you do, it's usually surrounded by struggling ones.

 

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11 hours ago, Mark J said:

It's really rare to see a healthy ash up here. When you do, it's usually surrounded by struggling ones.

 

How bizarre is that (seen likewise.)

Whilst sure it will also succumb in time, the FC talk about the wide genetic variations of Ash in the UK and the associated hope that some will be resistant :/ 

  

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DSC_0289.jpegDSC_0290.jpeg
We were clearly roadside saplings for junction sightlines last week and within the same clump growing off the same stump some were like this and some were perfectly healthy with not a mark on them

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With regard to 'healthy' wood growing from diseased stumps.

 

from experience with a sapling that had been growing in my backyard and which I only recently removed. As long as the tree or stump has not died off completely, you get fresh new growth at the start of each season which gradually succumbs to the disease as the year progresses.

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In the central reservation of the M27  there were lots of young , self seeded Ash whips of about 5 to 7 feet high . All looked in fine fettle .  They have just been along  with a flail and mullderd the lot . seems a shame to me .

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