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Tony Croft aka hamadryad

Pollards, the forgotten art-discussion

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So what made him think this was possible if all these trees died from the shock?

 

why not just fence them off from the stock?

 

they biult stone walls to fend timber trees from deer after all!

 

Because he cut the top off, as it was easier to cut, and bugger me it grew back!!!!!!!!!

 

A fence or wall is a LOT of work.

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Skyhuck, if stone age to medieval man was not VERY aware of the natural proscesses of the tree and had a VERY intuitive understanding of fungi How would you explain the following-

 

he seperated timber trees (butts of value as apposed to fodder or thin straight volumes)

 

he caried about him fungi of signifiant value (even buried with them to carry onto the afterlife)

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A man was found burried and on his person was the horses hoof fungus Fommes, the "tinder bracket" and piptoporus betulinus, known as the razor strop fungus and also believed to have anti parasitic medicinal properties.

 

worth mentioning that fommes is a highly valued fungus of pre history to ancient man, and would have been common place amoung the pollard and coppice woodlands

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Do you mean Otzi the iceman?

 

cant remember the details but sounds like thats the one.

 

\What about the failure of the oak picture, anyone going to comment on what their perception of this image is?

 

Dont be shy i wont judge, i am genuinley interested in views, good bad or indifferent:blushing:

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He is very interesting, such unusual preservation (sorry, I am an archaeologist by qualification...). Fungi does make good tinder though.

 

The oak? Don't ask me, completely unqualified to say- uh a branch fell off?!

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He is very interesting, such unusual preservation (sorry, I am an archaeologist by qualification...). Fungi does make good tinder though.

 

The oak? Don't ask me, completely unqualified to say- uh a branch fell off?!

 

:lol:

 

cool profesion, i think in time a great many disciplines will come together and make great strides due to "cross examination" of intertwined subjects.

 

its amazing what happens when somone from an entirley differnt field comes into a discussion and adds "personal insight" to the debate.

 

look at claus, he was an engineer, radical dude

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This is interesting but i am little lost..

 

What are you actually trying to say?

 

As huck says Pollarding was a practice undertaken for various reasons to retain the source of firewood and food.

 

That practice is seldom undertaken for those reasons now,now its a heritage reason- veteranising isnt pollarding. Making trees look like how they used to look is a very different function than managing a resource that you need to survive..

 

But i am still not sure what you are getting at..

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