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logwood

How many logs?

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But I am lucky to know tree surgeons. Nothing is free after all and I know how hard you tree surgeons work; being a gardener, I appreciate the graft involved.

Edited by logwood

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22 minutes ago, logwood said:

But I am lucky to know tree surgeons. Nothing is free after all and I know how hard you tree surgeons work; being a gardener, I appreciate the graft involved.

When I did logs I found a lot of tree surgeons would let me take arb arising of their work site for a 'drink' for the lads, whether the lads saw it or not I'm not sure.

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And I find... since I get it free from my uncle... or used to... that I make far more profit at 50 quid m3.    Higher volume of trade on the net.      Than over pricing.  
It's a lot easier to make more profit by selling the same amount to the same people for more, than it is to sell more to more people for the same amount. That's all I'm saying.

When you can't increase output, increase your returns. If you can't increase returns, increase output.
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18 hours ago, eggsarascal said:

When I did logs I found a lot of tree surgeons would let me take arb arising of their work site for a 'drink' for the lads, whether the lads saw it or not I'm not sure.

That is more or less what I do.  In MUCH smaller quantities though.  I'm just doing it for home use on a single small burner but I have an arrangement with one of the local tree surgeons/landscape gardener that if he is driving by the door he unloads at mine for a bottle of wine (or a few bottles if the load is larger).  He does logs himself but he off loads what he doesn't want as they get more than they can use themselves.

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And I find... since I get it free from my uncle... or used to... that I make far more profit at 50 quid m3.    Higher volume of trade on the net.      Than over pricing.  

That's because you're undercutting everyone else.
The average price of mixed hardwood logs air dried is £100 m3.
Double your price, lose the tight arse customers, and make a decent wage?

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All good points. I don’t think with the impending green focus that logs will be worth doing much longer. It’s very labour intensive but working with wood is very rewarding in itself. Might turn to turning bowls... can you believe that an article on radio 4 said a bbq is the same as a 100 mile car journey... thing is... it was there fault. Lol.

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