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eggsarascal

Knife and gun crime London

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A slip blade knife is not really a weapon, you'd be as likely to cut your own fingers to the bone if trying to stab with one. Slashing, yes, but you'd still want to be a bit of a ninja to pull it off and not hurt yourself. Throat cutting yes, but then you'd have to grab your victim from behind and take them unawares, and if you are in a position to do that, ie. a planned assassination, then you could just as easily choke him/her to death instead - the weapon becomes moot. So there is a rational to the locking blade law. Didn't Kahn put an end to stop-and-search with the excuse that it was "racial profiling"? I believe he did. Typical progressive denial of reality. The liberal mayor of New York did the same thing, stabbings went way up for years, eventually Rudi Juliani reinstated stop and search in certain neighbourhoods, and it went way down again. A law is only a law if the police can enforce it.

Edited by Haironyourchest
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8 minutes ago, Stere said:

Loads of boys used to take a knife to school

 

Never heard of a "pocket knife" that boys used to carry?

 

Just William wasn't  getting all stabby though.

 

 

Exactly. Times change, people change .

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I often carry a screw driver  in pocket I use to remove ivy from walls & trees trunks etc whilst gardenning.

 

Could be a stab weapon 🤔

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14 minutes ago, Stere said:

I often carry a screw driver  in pocket I use to remove ivy from walls & trees trunks etc whilst gardenning.

 

Could be a stab weapon 🤔

With the saw on my swisd army knife (and access to trees) I could fashion a Somali style club, or even a bow and arrows, given time.

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38 minutes ago, felixthelogchopper said:

https://www.dictionary.com/browse/reductio-ad-absurdum

 

OK, why would it would be appropriate for a child to take a knife to school? Suppose you went to a night club with a legal to carry knife; would you expect to be allowed in with it? If so, why? As to what I have in my pockets, I have keys which are for opening my truck and my house(legal and appropriate), money(legal and appropriate) and my phone(legal and etc). If I was at work then I would have a knife but I would have a reason by means of my work. If I was going to the pub, I wouldn't have a knife as I would have no need for one even though it was legal.

I've no idea. It's none of my business. I used to use mine to cut cheese, do up loose screws on wobbly chairs and threaten to cut first formers for their tuck money. As far as I recall anyway. 

If I went to a nightclub with a haircut that didn't fit , I'd be fine if they didn't let me in. It's their club. They'll lose my custom though. It's not the same as (a)public places and (b)being told rather than being asked.

Now imagine if I were to say this:

"I'm a bit worried about the content of your pockets. You could use the keys to go into your house where you could sit and use the internet to find out where I live. You could then use your keys to get in your truck and then use your phone satnav to drive here and run me over when I go out tomorrow morning. I'd like your things confiscated. You could use them to hurt me."

You'd think I was a twat for wanting to use the law to take your inanimate stuff from you when you only actually wanted to use it to do normal things. Why is it any different for something you don't see any use for but someone else might?

 

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We aren't getting anywhere here, rather than arguing about what should happen to these folk once they've plunged a knife into someone we need to stop it. We can't deport most of these lads, they are, on the whole, British born. A proper deterrent is needed, so, what is the answer?

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28 minutes ago, Stere said:

I often carry a screw driver  in pocket I use to remove ivy from walls & trees trunks etc whilst gardenning.

 

Could be a stab weapon 🤔

Best not take it into double Maths then.

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1 minute ago, eggsarascal said:

We aren't getting anywhere here, rather than arguing about what should happen to these folk once they've plunged a knife into someone we need to stop it. We can't deport most of these lads, they are, on the whole, British born. A proper deterrent is needed, so, what is the answer?

How about the possibility that someone they're going to stab might be carrying a pistol? I can't see anyone on this thread taking issue with that...

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1 minute ago, AHPP said:

I've no idea. It's none of my business. I used to use mine to cut cheese, do up loose screws on wobbly chairs and threaten to cut first formers for their tuck money. As far as I recall anyway. 

If I went to a nightclub with a haircut that didn't fit , I'd be fine if they didn't let me in. It's their club. They'll lose my custom though. It's not the same as (a)public places and (b)being told rather than being asked.

Now imagine if I were to say this:

"I'm a bit worried about the content of your pockets. You could use the keys to go into your house where you could sit and use the internet to find out where I live. You could then use your keys to get in your truck and then use your phone satnav to drive here and run me over when I go out tomorrow morning. I'd like your things confiscated. You could use them to hurt me."

You'd think I was a twat for wanting to use the law to take your inanimate stuff from you when you only actually wanted to use it to do normal things. Why is it any different for something you don't see any use for but someone else might?

 

Like I said, reductio ad absurdum is a very poor argument, even more so when you keep using it over and over again. How about answering the question I asked you about taking a knife into a nightclub? Yes, it's legal, but it it is not going to be an acceptable argument for an inappropriate thing to have in your pocket when you have no reason for having it. You're talking about being bloody minded to protect your liberties, I'm talking about employing some common sense and seeing that there is no good reason for a kid to take a knife to school.

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1 minute ago, AHPP said:

How about the possibility that someone they're going to stab might be carrying a pistol? I can't see anyone on this thread taking issue with that...

Knives or guns these mainly young lads are killing one n other for laughs. One kid dead another doing a fairly long stretch. Something needs to change.

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