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Processor Chain Sharpening

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I have bought a Tajfun rca 400 and I need to sharpen the chain . I am thinking about buying a bench grinder chain sharpener , but in the processor manual it says the chain needs sharpening with a 10degree incline and the only grinder with that capability are between three and four hundred pounds . Would a normal grinder that you can’t do the incline on suffice ? Thanks in advance 

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The incline makes absolutely no difference whatsoever.

Have a look at the granberg precision grinder on chainsawbars and the diamond bits for it. Very accurate and fast too!

Getting equal cutters and depth gauges is most important.

The oregon EXL chain is excellent on the 400 or semi chisel when you have less clean timber to cut. If it's clean wood you should get most of a day's work on one chain.

Look after your guide bars too. Keep them in tip top condition or you'll encounter plenty of strange issues!

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I think you get a better edge hand sharpening, I just use an old bar to put the chain on, but as above the 10degrees isn't essential and keeping the bar in good condition is important. Probably matters more than on a chainsaw. 

DSC_5333.JPG

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I think you get a better edge hand sharpening, I just use an old bar to put the chain on, but as above the 10degrees isn't essential and keeping the bar in good condition is important. Probably matters more than on a chainsaw. 
DSC_5333.thumb.JPG.e3b6cc1cfc37f5dc2c3f73e13f46467f.JPG
Don't want to start an argument and maybe you're better at it than me but I don't see how a machine that sharpens to an exact angle, height and tooth length can possibly be less sharp than doing it by hand. That is how they done at the factory although square ground though.

I can do 3 or 4 tanks through the chainsaw before needing a touch up with the granberg but by hand it's crap after 1 tank.

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Much as GDH. And yes a file does leave a better edge as to why I would guess it's just a finer finish than off the grinder.  I do use a grinder occasionally to even up the teeth length as again this seems to be more important on the processor than the chainsaw. On my small Farmi I don't knock the rackers down too hard either especially if the wood is dry and hard but may matter less with a tractor on Tajfan 400.

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Much as GDH. And yes a file does leave a better edge as to why I would guess it's just a finer finish than off the grinder.  I do use a grinder occasionally to even up the teeth length as again this seems to be more important on the processor than the chainsaw. On my small Farmi I don't knock the rackers down too hard either especially if the wood is dry and hard but may matter less with a tractor on Tajfan 400.
Not with a fine diamond stone it isn't! Sounds like a circular saw going through wood after that thing!

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1 minute ago, SbTVF said:

Not with a fine diamond stone it isn't! emoji23.png Sounds like a circular saw going through wood after that thing!

But they don't come out of the factory with nice fine grinding marks they come out with coarse grinding marks. Maybe the Grandenberg leaves a better finish than tradition grinders as it grinds with the tooth instead of across the tooth? 

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23 minutes ago, SbTVF said:

Don't want to start an argument and maybe you're better at it than me but I don't see how a machine that sharpens to an exact angle, height and tooth length can possibly be less sharp than doing it by hand. That is how they done at the factory although square ground though.

I can do 3 or 4 tanks through the chainsaw before needing a touch up with the granberg but by hand it's crap after 1 tank.

Admittedly I didn't spend a lot of time with a machine but I just found it was easy to burr the edge and it takes a squarer cut than a file does.

 

I guess it's just personal preference, some people like to give brand new chains a touch up but I wouldn't go that far. 

 

For the processor I do 5 strokes to a tooth and don't touch the depth guages unless I've hit something and have to extra sharpening.  That's also when the machine tempts me. ;)

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7 hours ago, TRH logs said:

I have bought a Tajfun rca 400 and I need to sharpen the chain . I am thinking about buying a bench grinder chain sharpener , but in the processor manual it says the chain needs sharpening with a 10degree incline and the only grinder with that capability are between three and four hundred pounds . Would a normal grinder that you can’t do the incline on suffice ? Thanks in advance 

Get in touch with RobD maybe he can help.

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