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JoBuck

Big old Oak to be milled but what cuts???

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Hi all,

I'm getting this big oak milled and have some space in a yard to air dry it but looking for different advice on best cuts that will maximise the value but also keep it reasonably move-able (ie. can get 3 or 4 pairs of hands for the day and have to get it out from a back garden but have a log trolley). Not sure whether to mill lots of long wide boards 2 1/4 thick and what lengths or mix it up. I might be getting a summerhouse/storage shed built in the back garden and could use some of it (or all of it ) for that but i feel the real value is in the big slabs as its a big lump of wood!

When i felled it it ran forward a meter and ended up just touching the fence so i've winched it back to give some room around it in preparation for milling but now its at a bit of an angle!

any thoughts?

Stem is 1.2m diameter (almost both ends) and 4.8m long.

photos showing both ends.

(ps. There was major buttress root damage where landscapers several years earlier had cut right into it when laying the patio! I tried to persuade the clients to keep the tree and just go for a reduction but they wouldn't change their minds.)

cheers jo

 

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a tree that size should really be quartersawn as much as possible as this will keep the boards nice and stable during the drying process along with each board looking nicer one turned into something like furniture... 

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15 minutes ago, Forest2Furniture said:

It'll smart a bit if the chains catches it!

Yes but often the stain runs vertically from the contaminant so it may be possible to take a few boards off and detect it, then run the cut either side and wedge the board apart to avoid cutting the iron.

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Yes but often the stain runs vertically from the contaminant so it may be possible to take a few boards off and detect it, then run the cut either side and wedge the board apart to avoid cutting the iron.

It's even possible it's in the stump.
But in my experience, it's about the 3rd-4th board in, and a 4" nail.

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Hi all,

thanks for replies, so is quartersawn what most would do? 

 it will definitely make shifting it all out easier and will it make locating the possible bit of metal easier. what lengths would you cut from the 4.8m total, 2 x 2.4m or 2 different lengths

still keen for a few big slabs but worried about moving them!

cheers jo

 

 

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