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meaple

Sycamore tree with TPO

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Hi All, I could use some advice from experienced arborists. Please excuse my lack of knowledge on verge of ignorance, but it's all new to me and not even close to my profession.

 

I live in Bedfordshire, soil type in my area is chalk/Soilscape 5: Freely draining lime-rich loamy soils - loamy (depending on maps used). Sycamore TPO tree is approx 50-60 ft tall, crown spreas between 39-45 ft, tree is located 9m from my front porch and 10m from main building. Building is 13 years old, timber frame end of terrace. 

I've noticed some damage to my drive (material tarmac, irregular bumps, no cracking) and property. Porch door and window frame crooked, cracks on brickwork coming down on both sides of windowsill (two of them further away from tree are 2-3mm, colser one is 1-1.5cm), 2 internal door frames crooked and some hairline cracks on plasterboard joins.

 

Can this damage be caused by tree root system?

Who I need to speak with to have it assessed?

What is approximate cost of survey?

What is deemed as safe distance for large sycamore tree from property boundary?

Is there any official guidance (when submitting planning application) for tree distance by type from property boundaries?

Can I build carport beneath TPO tree (in line with planning regs), or I need to get approval from Tree Officer as well?

What would be the best route to have TPO removed and tree replaced with smaller less intrusive tree? 

 

Thank you for your understanding and patience.

 

Just realized that this is probably in wrong place, can this be moved to homeowners or deleted?

 

 

Edited by meaple
Just realized that this is probably in wrong place, can this be moved to homeowners or deleted?

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6 hours ago, meaple said:

Hi All, I could use some advice from experienced arborists. Please excuse my lack of knowledge on verge of ignorance, but it's all new to me and not even close to my profession.

 

I live in Bedfordshire, soil type in my area is chalk/Soilscape 5: Freely draining lime-rich loamy soils - loamy (depending on maps used). Sycamore TPO tree is approx 50-60 ft tall, crown spreas between 39-45 ft, tree is located 9m from my front porch and 10m from main building. Building is 13 years old, timber frame end of terrace. 

I've noticed some damage to my drive (material tarmac, irregular bumps, no cracking) and property. Porch door and window frame crooked, cracks on brickwork coming down on both sides of windowsill (two of them further away from tree are 2-3mm, colser one is 1-1.5cm), 2 internal door frames crooked and some hairline cracks on plasterboard joins.

 

Can this damage be caused by tree root system?

Who I need to speak with to have it assessed?

What is approximate cost of survey?

What is deemed as safe distance for large sycamore tree from property boundary?

Is there any official guidance (when submitting planning application) for tree distance by type from property boundaries?

Can I build carport beneath TPO tree (in line with planning regs), or I need to get approval from Tree Officer as well?

What would be the best route to have TPO removed and tree replaced with smaller less intrusive tree? 

 

Thank you for your understanding and patience.

 

Just realized that this is probably in wrong place, can this be moved to homeowners or deleted?

 

 

I also am no expert but it seems unlikely the problems with the building are caused by the tree.  Roots would not spread that far and a modern build would have deep foundations.

 

Photos might help.

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Pics would help.

I would suggest getting a tree survey by someone familiar with bs5387 (British standard for trees and built environment). Even if the survey says it is not tree related at least you will have the tree assessed for safety too.

Single tree survey cost approx £400 max. Hopefully less.

Jan.

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4 hours ago, EdwardC said:

Get your insurance company involved, they'll deal with all of it.

Wouldn't that increase premium and create problem for later if in ie.10 years I would like to sell property? My other concern is that it could/would decrease value of the property and this is what I can't afford. 
 

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We had suspected subsidence in a property - ummed and ahhed over involving the insurers for the same reasons as yourself. 

In the end we bit the bullet, their expert came out, clarified that it was in fact settlement and wasn’t an issue.

If in your case it is subsidence I’d imagine you will need to call upon your insurers as it is unlikely to be a cheap fix... From a future value point of view, once the insurers action a repair there should not be any further issues. If they ascertain it is not subsidence then likewise, no issues (other than the cost you will incur making good, which you are facing anyway). 

I’d involve them personally. 

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Good advice ^
That tree has the potential to influence the soil under your property.
Contacting insurance sooner rather than later is probably your best bet. The site investigations and surveys to determine the cause of damage are likely to cost more than the excess on your policy.  I have heard of insurance companies refusing to pay out if they aren't informed of any damage in good time, so read the small print.
 

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2 hours ago, meaple said:

Wouldn't that increase premium and create problem for later if in ie.10 years I would like to sell property? My other concern is that it could/would decrease value of the property and this is what I can't afford. 
 

When selling the property, potential buyers will usually get a surveyors report on the property. Any problems will be highlighted in the report. As said, get your insurance company involved now, the problem may get worse if you leave it

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Well if you are seeking to get rid of the tree you should find you have a lot of hoops to jump through. That is what your insurers do, its what you pay for.

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