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RobInNorfolk

Kitchen worktops

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Does anyone have any views on either sweet chestnut or a redwood species for a kitchen worktop? Am thinking that both are rot resistant but am less sure on how they would be in other respects. Not sure the chestnut would take a great finish, but that’s just a preconception.

The joiner is recommending elm or iroko. Worried that iroko may not be very sustainable.

Any thoughts greatly appreciated.

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10 minutes ago, RobInNorfolk said:

 

Does anyone have any views on either sweet chestnut or a redwood species for a kitchen worktop? Am thinking that both are rot resistant but am less sure on how they would be in other respects. Not sure the chestnut would take a great finish, but that’s just a preconception.

The joiner is recommending elm or iroko. Worried that iroko may not be very sustainable.

Any thoughts greatly appreciated.

 

Chestnut might be an issue unless heavily protected as the extremely high tannin content will mean it will react strongly with anything ferrous left on it. So for instance, if you left a tin on the worktop overnight (maybe the tin was wet underneath) you'd potentially have a lovely blue ring stained into the work surface.

 

Redwood would be much too soft. It would mark quickly. 

 

Sycamore is a good timber for a worktop. Non reactive and stable.

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Sweet chestnut and redwood a bit soft.  Chestnut finishes well. Elm would be good.  Most important thing is how you finish it and joint it and if it is dry enough.

 

Redwood is very stable so good in that respect just soft.

 

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Out of the 2 you mention I'd go for sweet chestnut. As Jonathan says it'll stain unless you oil it ( I'd suggest tung oil x10 coats)

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if elm is an option go for that as it looks the best out of the lot.

 

iroko is not that sustainable any more and needs to be left alone in the joinery world.

 

sweet chestnut is a bit boring in my view and although softwood species can be big and look great as a worktop they are just that bit soft as other have said.

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29 minutes ago, RobInNorfolk said:

Thanks all. Choosing between elm and Douglas. I think sycamore might be difficult to keep nice round the sink.

It doesn't matter which wood you use none of them will fair well around a sink.

I've used Ash in the past for work surfaces and finished with danish oil.

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It doesn't matter which wood you use none of them will fair well around a sink.
I've used Ash in the past for work surfaces and finished with danish oil.
Correct.
Elm and beech around same sink. Many layers of tunng, 4 yrs ago.
20190515_205405.jpeg20190515_205446.jpeg

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Even if you used an undermounted sink you'll have problems around the taps and the drip bead.

Wooden work surface are great but no good near water, I suggest you use granite for that bit.

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