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Traditional timber frame

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Hi All 

looking to hopefully go ahead with a traditional timber frame sunroom later this summer. Material will be Douglas Fir Which I have ready for the job and intend to mill it myself. Just wondering if anyone knows of an architect up in Aberdeenshire that undertakes that sort of work where I can get a set of drawings made up. Also whilst the foundations and dwarf walls etc are no probs and I've built a few timber frame agriculture type buildings over the years this time around seeing as it's the family home I'd be looking to get some professional assistance. Once again if anyone can point me in the direction of any firm or individuals up here that would be appreciated. 

Cheers 

Edited by Johnsond
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Structural design of traditional timber frames tends to be a fairly niche type of work in my experience and not many companies have developed expertise. I'm sure most structural engineers could prepare a 'safe' design but getting the expertise would probably make it a 'better' design. I don't know of anyone with this expertise around your area. But I was chatting to a traditional timber framer in Argyll recently and he uses a structural engineer in Edinburgh and I worked for a company in Edinburgh about 12 years ago who also have this expertise. I'll try to find the details and pm you later.

 

A project I worked on about 10 years ago on the West Coast of Scotland was the largest traditional oak framed house in Scotland at that time and the timber frame company who fabricated and erected it, had the structural design carried out by their usual engineer in the South of England. My role was certifying the structural design plus designing all the other structural elements such as foundations, etc. Although their engineer was at the other end of the U.K. the whole process went smoothly, so distance isn't necessarily a problem, but you may also want someone local who is also able to grade your milled timbers? I'm pretty sure there are members of ASHS who are qualified timber graders and they may be prepared to pass on the names of engineers who have worked on projects they have supplied timber for which might yield a local engineer?

 

Andrew

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1 hour ago, ucoulddoit said:

Structural design of traditional timber frames tends to be a fairly niche type of work in my experience and not many companies have developed expertise. I'm sure most structural engineers could prepare a 'safe' design but getting the expertise would probably make it a 'better' design. I don't know of anyone with this expertise around your area. But I was chatting to a traditional timber framer in Argyll recently and he uses a structural engineer in Edinburgh and I worked for a company in Edinburgh about 12 years ago who also have this expertise. I'll try to find the details and pm you later.

 

A project I worked on about 10 years ago on the West Coast of Scotland was the largest traditional oak framed house in Scotland at that time and the timber frame company who fabricated and erected it, had the structural design carried out by their usual engineer in the South of England. My role was certifying the structural design plus designing all the other structural elements such as foundations, etc. Although their engineer was at the other end of the U.K. the whole process went smoothly, so distance isn't necessarily a problem, but you may also want someone local who is also able to grade your milled timbers? I'm pretty sure there are members of ASHS who are qualified timber graders and they may be prepared to pass on the names of engineers who have worked on projects they have supplied timber for which might yield a local engineer?

 

Andrew

Hi Andrew 

Thanks for the info. 

PM sent 

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Hi guys , my new partners at my yard are just undertaking a D Fir timber frame build and I am interested in what he is doing he has a 6 mar span and is trying to use 6x2s but he has 3 joins that are just bolted with coach bolts as soon as I saw it I did say to him it wouldn’t work now he is trying to brace it up with like 2mm strips of steel , in my mind he needs to start again with some bigger beams what do you all think is there like any guide lines for timber frame work , if it was me it would be like 4x6 at least .

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Hi guys , my new partners at my yard are just undertaking a D Fir timber frame build and I am interested in what he is doing he has a 6 mar span and is trying to use 6x2s but he has 3 joins that are just bolted with coach bolts as soon as I saw it I did say to him it wouldn’t work now he is trying to brace it up with like 2mm strips of steel , in my mind he needs to start again with some bigger beams what do you all think is there like any guide lines for timber frame work , if it was me it would be like 4x6 at least .

That resin stuff is mad.
We had diagonal cracks in my old workshop beams.
Structural engineer said no problem,
Fill em with resin.

For your mate Gobby, he could laminate with resin but ideally needs pressure to make the whole stable.
You're right about the bolts.

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3 hours ago, gobbypunk said:

Hi guys , my new partners at my yard are just undertaking a D Fir timber frame build and I am interested in what he is doing he has a 6 mar span and is trying to use 6x2s but he has 3 joins that are just bolted with coach bolts as soon as I saw it I did say to him it wouldn’t work now he is trying to brace it up with like 2mm strips of steel , in my mind he needs to start again with some bigger beams what do you all think is there like any guide lines for timber frame work , if it was me it would be like 4x6 at least .

Bit difficult to comment without pics, but in my experience a 6m span is going to need a 9 inch X 3 inch beam with no big faults, and this is assuming it is taking no real weight - ie just roofing sheets and maybe some snow.  If it is a floor taking any weight it will need way more than this.  Their will be structural strength tables you can find on t'interweb, but it will be very complex and difficult to follow I guarantee.

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13 hours ago, gobbypunk said:

Hi guys , my new partners at my yard are just undertaking a D Fir timber frame build and I am interested in what he is doing he has a 6 mar span and is trying to use 6x2s but he has 3 joins that are just bolted with coach bolts as soon as I saw it I did say to him it wouldn’t work now he is trying to brace it up with like 2mm strips of steel , in my mind he needs to start again with some bigger beams what do you all think is there like any guide lines for timber frame work , if it was me it would be like 4x6 at least .

6x2s with joins for 6m! These tables might help http://nhbccampaigns.co.uk/landingpages/techzone/previous_versions/2010/Part6/section4/appendix.htm

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The old rule of thumb is 1/2 an inch per foot of span plus 1 inch therefore to span 10ft you would need a 6x2 this is for floor joists and roof timbers I know there will be exceptions and different loadings but for most housing situations this works.

 

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