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I need to cut a few slices of wood to use as table ornamnets for a friends wedding. Ive heard them being called cookies before....

I was just wondering if anyone has done this before and what wood i should use and how to treat them and dry them out?

 

Cheers, James.

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Either use a seasoned log which won't be very large.
Or cut them fresh the day before you need them.
The only discs I've cut which haven't split were beech and sycamore about 4"-6" thick and 30"+ diameter.

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I did this for my next door neighbors daughter last month . They gave me a length of Ash and I made them about 1" thick  Think they stole it from road side somewhere .

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I did this for my next door neighbors daughter last month . They gave me a length of Ash and I made them about 1" thick  Think they stole it from road side somewhere .


More likely to find a seasoned ash log than any other.

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You either need to accept that they will most likely crack as they dry, or use them green and accept that they will be single-use. On the other hand, I have heard that horse chestnut resists cracking, though I can't confirm this first-hand. It has a very soft texture apparently.

Edited by Beardie
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14 hours ago, Beardie said:

You either need to accept that they will most likely crack as they dry, or use them green and accept that they will be single-use. On the other hand, I have heard that horse chestnut resists cracking, though I can't confirm this first-hand. It has a very soft texture apparently.

The landlord of my workshop used to run a business making lamp stands and bases and was very fond of Horse Chestnut as it used to be more resistant to splitting when cut this way (and because it was cheap being bugger all use for much else). Could be worth a try.

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I've done quite a few of these over the years for different folks.  Have used oak, lime, sitka, larch and possible ash, but can't remember for sure.  I tend to cut them a few days to a week before they're needed as it lets the fresh smell disipate a wee bit, but keeps them from cracking too quickly.  Most folk only want them for single use anyway so if the split in the long run its not a big deal.  The spruce ones were for the community council for some event and are stored in our shed, they've stood up surprisingly well with very few split after over a year, they're only about 6" diameter so that might make a difference.  Have done some up to about 2' diameter for cake stands, not sure how well they stood the test of time.

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Can a piece of thin plywood on the bottom stop them from splitting? Like they did on that redwood kings programme with the slices of redwood as large tables and timelines etc?

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