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MikePepler

What to do with a broken 346xp?

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6 hours ago, Haironyourchest said:

Cheap fix and keep it as a stumper and for really dirty jobs, and as a loaner.

this is a 346 we are talking about here!!!! :)

wouldnt do any of the above with mine.

 

Edited by carlos

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4 minutes ago, carlos said:

this is a 346 we are talking about here!!!! :)

wouldnt do any of the above with mine.

 

You don't know what you are missing if you would not send it to Spud .

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The OP has been in touch, prices swapped and is in his hands. Will see what falls out but the issues are the main bearings - may have debris in them, the crank - has it suffered any damage, what caused the original failure - has the bore suffered. Not an easy one to call without inspection but up to the OP to decide.

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Mike Pepler, the celebrity!

 

Recognise the name from years ago on youtube!

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8 hours ago, scbk said:

Mike Pepler, the celebrity!

 

Recognise the name from years ago on youtube!

Hardly! 🙂

 

But as you mention it, here's a video to show why I ended up with a spare 346xp in first place. Battery saws won't be for everyone or every situation, and I still have a working 346xp and 570 as well, but the electric one has done well enough over this winter that I felt I no longer needed two 346xp's:

 

 

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1 hour ago, MikePepler said:

But as you mention it, here's a video to show why I ended up with a spare 346xp in first place.

and why you have a chogs left over too.

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20 minutes ago, openspaceman said:

and why you have a chogs left over too.

You mean the lump off the bottom of the stem? I leave them in the woods to rot for biodiversity benefits.

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1 hour ago, MikePepler said:

You mean the lump off the bottom of the stem? I leave them in the woods to rot for biodiversity benefits.

I expect you wear green welly boots too, sloppy workmanship but I'll not have a hissy fit like TCD  even though I agreed with him.🙂

 

Chestnut coppice is a relative newcomer but the  niche created by coppicing was largely one of artificially removing nutrients available at the surface to the herbaceous layer [1]. Underwood was the province of the poor people and they made use of everything they had bought. As such on the heavier soils that had remained in woodland had an impoverished surface layer, it is this and the regular baring of the ground to let sunlight in that gives plants like bluebells a competitive edge over grasses and brambles.

 

The minerals for the woody species get replaced by mycorrhizal associations with the deeper tree roots and return to the surface as leaves drop in the autumn.

 

[1] this also meant little bonfires didn't happen in coppice cants

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12 minutes ago, openspaceman said:

I expect you wear green welly boots too, sloppy workmanship but I'll not have a hissy fit like TCD  even though I agreed with him.🙂

 

Chestnut coppice is a relative newcomer but the  niche created by coppicing was largely one of artificially removing nutrients available at the surface to the herbaceous layer [1]. Underwood was the province of the poor people and they made use of everything they had bought. As such on the heavier soils that had remained in woodland had an impoverished surface layer, it is this and the regular baring of the ground to let sunlight in that gives plants like bluebells a competitive edge over grasses and brambles.

 

The minerals for the woody species get replaced by mycorrhizal associations with the deeper tree roots and return to the surface as leaves drop in the autumn.

 

[1] this also meant little bonfires didn't happen in coppice cants

I know it's best to cut as low as possible, but I find the curvature and thickening at the base of chestnut stems annoying when I'm processing them later for firewood (which is what most of the wood is used for, and I use a Truncator for processing), so I tend to cut a little bit higher and leave the chog behind. Is there any reason not to? Happy to improve my knowledge if so.

 

I stopped having fires about 10 years ago, saves time and avoids breathing in lots of smoke and killing the seeds in the ground where the fire would have been. I've seen wrens, robins and mice making good use of the brash piles I've left instead.

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