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cjdg

BIG bang on my TW 150

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Even if you have sound fins , I forget the hours they recommend to change but they are worth changing as a pair to prevent what happened to yours from happening again...

last bearing change I had the mechanic told me this was the cause for most of the premature bearing wear and big failures was people trying to keep the fans on with uneven wear until they fail completely.

I’ve had 6-7 rebuilds on 5 different TW and entecs which over the 20 or more years I’ve been using them isn’t bad.. the last one by the guys at greenlay in cramlington was absolutely spot on , 18 year old chipper came back feeling new.

 

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yes mate you are being given correct info all round , the fans come as a weighted pair for balance ( usually written on in marker pen on each fan at Timberwolf ) . yes new bearings ,why wouldn't you if its stripped. Balance is important , we have a balancing jig at the depot but it can be done in situ . you can load up the fan bolts with washers or there are sometimes spare holes in the rotor wheel for extra bolts to aid the balance. Give the surface of the wheel a good clean as you don't want anything under the fans as you bolt them in coz this will create a weak spot. Gareth of Green Plant.

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Latest development is that I have managed to clean off the machine and get it inside. Thanks are owed to Gareth who has supplied the parts for tomorrow (couriers permitting!).  Dean said "After taking off the drive pulley, 

I undid the four bolts securing the front bearing housing and withdrew the flywheel."

 

Well, I have just spent an hour and a half with a mate trying to do those six words "After taking off the drive pulley" !!!!!

There are supposed to be three grub screws holding in a conical taper lock bush and, as one was cross threaded, it was empty so that left two to undo opposite each other luckily. Once undone, logic dictates that you tap the pulley wheel off the taper onto the shaft in the direction of the flywheel away from the engine THEN pull the bush and key out towards the engine.  The bush is well and truly "stuck" in. 

 

I have tried a blow lamp both sides of the bush, heating the bush and wheel rather than the shaft.  I have put on gallons of penetrating oil spray let it go in and then tried to shift it.  I have tried shifting just the key with a long blunt screwdriver to loosen it off. I have tried levering it off with the bush as a last resort.   Must be doing something that should be mindlessly simple wrongly!  Any ideas chaps? 

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12 minutes ago, cjdg said:

There are supposed to be three grub screws holding in a conical taper lock bush and, as one was cross threaded, it was empty so that left two to undo opposite each other luckily.

It's a long time since I did anything with taperlocks but the two screws opposite each other pull the tapers together. The third hole has only half a thread in it. you put one of the screw into this and tighten and it drives the two  bits of the taper apart.

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43 minutes ago, openspaceman said:

It's a long time since I did anything with taperlocks but the two screws opposite each other pull the tapers together. The third hole has only half a thread in it. you put one of the screw into this and tighten and it drives the two  bits of the taper apart.

This

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23 minutes ago, cjdg said:

I knew it had to be something mindlessly simple

 

I would clean the shaft as best you can first and use a bit of oil and   tap the outer lightly as you screw in. Avoid tapping near  the Vee grooves.

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Latest question please.  The anvil on the main plate is a) welded on by the same sort of animal to which Dean referred. b) is well worn.  I appear to have to choices:

1) build it up with a weld in situ then file or grind it to a roughly square section shape

2) grind off the weld, undo the nuts and buy a new anvil and put it on 

I favour No 2) and if that is the consensus would it be sensible to animalistically tack it on with a weld as well?  I can only presume that this was done (as it was for the anvils on the flywheel) due to experience of them coming off in the past

 

So Questions 

Do I go for 1) or 2)

If I go for 2) do I weld it

What experience do others have of any such NEED for welding with the anvils coming off or bolts coming undone?

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I would seriously check over the rotar nose shafts for any wear too whilst at this point , wear will make the difference between 50hours and a rebuild or 600 and counting from experience.

 

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