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cjdg

BIG bang on my TW 150

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Big bang! so switched off PDQ. Sounded like a bearing (casing?) had gone with lots of heavy knocking but on looking at the Maintenance manual could not see this part shown in photo below.  It has evidence of metal fatigue over 1/3 of the cracked  casing (Image 78970.  I suspect it is associated with a bearing housing.  I need (I think) the following but subject to better advice:

1) a workshop manual if one such thing exits outside favoured manufaturers' listed agents

2) the spare part in question

3) advice as to what other parts I should sensibly replace since I have to take it to bits anyway (full set of bearings for the roller")

Question

The machine is in Oxford OX1.  Does anyone know of any recommended service agent that can provide an estimate (it would not be easy to provide a quote till it is in bits) or guideline price and rates to take this off my hands.  It is outside but at a push (literally) could just about be put inside. 

Chris G

PHOTO-2019-03-01-11-56-50.jpg

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Those are the flywheel fans that are attached to the rear of the rotor. Common failure.

 

Might not be too bad, but you’ll need to strip it.

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Hi , that's unlucky to damage the chamber wall , usually they fly out the chute . I can help you with all of your questions , parts , catalogue pages etc. And we have depots that can look at and quote the job for you . And not too far from your location either. Genuine Timberwolf parts and qualified technicians. Gareth of Green Plant 01483 235111

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My 150 cracked and lost bits of the ally fins twice in 12 years, never as dramatically as that.

 

I recall they made a beefed up fin later on, which I fitted to good effect.

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Shed a blade before , i remember watching the fins fly out the chute into the chip bin, its an awful feeling. Cost me £1,500 to get it repaired, that prompted me to learn how to rebuild timber wolf chippers, now repair them in my barn, its not too difficult if you invest in the correct tools.

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Thanks Mick and other Chaps! Gareth, Thanks for the offer but before I read this, I rolled up my sleeves this afternoon and got as far as getting to the rotor wheel, so everything is off including the plate and roller assembly and am now going to take off the rotor wheel but not sure just how it is extracted.  I assume that a little penetrating oil, an assistant to hold and put pressure outwards on both sides and then tap it to loosen it and pull it off?  See photo below. 

 

I see that the fans are sold in pairs and wondered if (as is said above it is a common fault) my original thought of only replacing one was misplaced and that it would be best to junk the sound one on there and put in two new ones?  I am puzzled as to what the strain is on this fan as it is only driving air and not as if it is taking much load as for example the anvil and blades.   Is it worth replacing all the bearings at the same time as they do not appear to be bad? Seems to me a small investment given the time taken to take it all to bits just to replace them. Thoughts? 

IMG_7910.JPG

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Yes replace the bearings while it’s out if possible, also the anvils could usually do with a turn or replace.

 

As for the fins, replace them both to eliminate any chance of imbalance, my guess is they used cast aluminium to keep flywheel weight down.

 

Dean Lofthouse did a walkthrough on a TW bearing change on here way back, I’ll see if I can find it.

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8 hours ago, cjdg said:

Thanks Mick and other Chaps! Gareth, Thanks for the offer but before I read this, I rolled up my sleeves this afternoon and got as far as getting to the rotor wheel, so everything is off including the plate and roller assembly and am now going to take off the rotor wheel but not sure just how it is extracted.  I assume that a little penetrating oil, an assistant to hold and put pressure outwards on both sides and then tap it to loosen it and pull it off?  See photo below. 

 

I see that the fans are sold in pairs and wondered if (as is said above it is a common fault) my original thought of only replacing one was misplaced and that it would be best to junk the sound one on there and put in two new ones?  I am puzzled as to what the strain is on this fan as it is only driving air and not as if it is taking much load as for example the anvil and blades.   Is it worth replacing all the bearings at the same time as they do not appear to be bad? Seems to me a small investment given the time taken to take it all to bits just to replace them. Thoughts? 

IMG_7910.JPG

Found it!

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