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Douglas Fir and sequoia value

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Hey Big J,

 

Thanks for the advice. I've heard of Pol Bergius, got his leaflet somewhere. And thanks for the info re; value of tree butt. ( I'd forgotten what a great Forum this is, just returned to it as I'm looking for trailer info) 

 

I hadn't realised the huge difference in quality/perceived value of imported V homegrown timber. I do know that there is a movement (here in Scotland anyway) to use more local timber in buildings and an argument that (some of) it is not as poor quality as has been traditionally believed.

I recently got some planed, Scottish larch, and it is lovely stuff and would make a beautiful internal cladding, however I don't know how much work it took to get that result from a local tree and when I wanted longer lengths, rather than 2.1m, it started to get trickier to source.

 

I think I'll take your advice and do some proper planning; maybe hire a horse-logger to pull timber to roadside ( got lots of Larch thinnings too) and then hire a Woodmizer chap for a couple of days.

 

I'm guessing there are many folk like me, who start off chainsaw milling and quickly realise it is a time-consuming way to make giant piles of sawdust! Good fun and good opportunities for DIY / side projects, but not viable for big projects or timber to sell.

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4 minutes ago, Wulbert said:

Hey Big J,

 

Thanks for the advice. I've heard of Pol Bergius, got his leaflet somewhere. And thanks for the info re; value of tree butt. ( I'd forgotten what a great Forum this is, just returned to it as I'm looking for trailer info) 

 

I hadn't realised the huge difference in quality/perceived value of imported V homegrown timber. I do know that there is a movement (here in Scotland anyway) to use more local timber in buildings and an argument that (some of) it is not as poor quality as has been traditionally believed.

I recently got some planed, Scottish larch, and it is lovely stuff and would make a beautiful internal cladding, however I don't know how much work it took to get that result from a local tree and when I wanted longer lengths, rather than 2.1m, it started to get trickier to source.

 

I think I'll take your advice and do some proper planning; maybe hire a horse-logger to pull timber to roadside ( got lots of Larch thinnings too) and then hire a Woodmizer chap for a couple of days.

 

I'm guessing there are many folk like me, who start off chainsaw milling and quickly realise it is a time-consuming way to make giant piles of sawdust! Good fun and good opportunities for DIY / side projects, but not viable for big projects or timber to sell.

Pol is very good indeed. He's been milling with mobile LT40 Woodmizers for about 20 years now, if not longer. 

 

A horse won't be able to shift a log of that size unless cut very short, so you'll need to make alternative arrangements.

 

I was a member of the Association of Scottish Hardwood Sawmillers for about 8 years when we lived there, and yes, you are right about the push to use homegrown. There is a limit to that though as almost 50% of Scottish forestry is sitka (which won't grade past C16 due to the rapidity of its growth). Larch can grow wonderfully in certain spots (old growth European springs to mind) but it's mostly poor as it's either Japanese or Hybrid, and often full of tension from growing on exposed sites. 

 

Douglas is always nice when you find it, but one to really look out for cladding (internal or external) is Crytomeria Japonica, otherwise known as Japanese red cedar or Sugi. Far superior to Western red cedar but rare. I had one batch from Argyll and sold it to a customer (milled) that only ever took WRC. After having the sugi, he said he'd take any and all I ever found.

 

 

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Big J,

 

I hadn't heard of Japanese red cedar. I shall keep an eye out for it. The big DF will need to stay in situ I think, poor access for a vehicle and muddy ground. Or, as you say, chopped into 6ft-8ft lengths and not as attractive.

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10 minutes ago, Wulbert said:

Big J,

 

I hadn't heard of Japanese red cedar. I shall keep an eye out for it. The big DF will need to stay in situ I think, poor access for a vehicle and muddy ground. Or, as you say, chopped into 6ft-8ft lengths and not as attractive.

A lucas mill would be a good option for it. Build the mill over the log and mill in situ.

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Might be an option actually. It is lying almost horizontal and 3-4ft off ground. If I thought the timber could pay for the hire etc. and leave a cube for my own use it could be a good wee adventure.

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