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Battery climbing saws....husky or stihl??

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Im looking to buy a battery top handle to replace my stihl ms201. Ive got my eye on the stihl msa 160 and the husq t536lixp. What experiences do you guys/girls have with them?? Im not sure which one to go for!!! Which one would you recommend?? Cheers 

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The Husky. Had a 160 for over a year, got annoyed with its lack of power, gave it to my apprentice, and got a 150.
But a battery saw will never replace my 201tc. I find the 150 or baby Echo great for climbing when there is some fat deadwood to remove or a nasty reduction on the job

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Agreed! 

We have the husqvarna. Great for pruning thinning etc and nice not having to pull to start is nice.

once you go into 4 inch or bigger, gets too slow.

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I have no experience of using the husky, but I did handle both Husky and Stihl and preferred the feel of the Stihl. Can't say it looks pretty!

In use very happy with the Stihl, agreed that MS150T had more power. I find the 160T usual for a lot of pruning, also for first part of dismantles.

I haven't hear anyone else comment on the safety aspect, but I feel the slow speed of the electric 160T can only help reduce the risk of major injuries.

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I have the Husky, it’s nice and everything, you do have to change the way you cut.

 

You find yourself caught out with the slow speed, you cannot power through cuts so that you’re through before the branch starts to fall, it can pinch easily like that and wank that crappy techlite bar.

 

I love it for hedge reductions, but I’m all about the little Echo now. 

So light it’s a joke and better cutting.

Edited by Mick Dempsey
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I have used husky about 2 years now and I like it a lot. Pruning goes with out any problems and some small fells too. There are still some problems too. About after a year we needed to replace whole saw after it didn't work any more. We found out that it got moisture inside and that broke electronics. Second problem is cold weather. In Finland winters are below -5 usually every day and that makes battery's last about 3 cuts. It helps little bit if you store battery's in cars warm side (cabinet) on workdays. After -15 saw usually doesn't even start, it just shows a red blinking light. No experience about Stihl.

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Not painting the best picture here :( was looking at the husky top handle, back handle and 3 batta and a charger.... 1100 odd plus vat though! 

 

Just attracted to the quiet works and less shouting over noise and less vibe

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2 hours ago, maybelateron said:

I have no experience of using the husky, but I did handle both Husky and Stihl and preferred the feel of the Stihl. Can't say it looks pretty!

In use very happy with the Stihl, agreed that MS150T had more power. I find the 160T usual for a lot of pruning, also for first part of dismantles.

I haven't hear anyone else comment on the safety aspect, but I feel the slow speed of the electric 160T can only help reduce the risk of major injuries.

I find the the lack of noise makes me subconsciously not think of it as a chainsaw so I’m tempted to do cuts I should be doing with the silky.

i expect there to be more “cutting and holding “ accidents because of this and that they are so well balanced for one handed used

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10 minutes ago, s o c said:

I find the the lack of noise makes me subconsciously not think of it as a chainsaw so I’m tempted to do cuts I should be doing with the silky.

i expect there to be more “cutting and holding “ accidents because of this and that they are so well balanced for one handed used

Funny you should say that, I believe, perhaps wrongly, that the run down is much faster on the battery saws, in other words you’re less likely to get cut than with a petrol saw.

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4 minutes ago, Mick Dempsey said:

Funny you should say that, I believe, perhaps wrongly, that the run down is much faster on the battery saws, in other words you’re less likely to get cut than with a petrol saw.

Yes ,run down is faster and they don’t seem to kick back as badly but I think what’s dangerous practice with a fast chainsaw is also dangerous with a slow one. 

I think it’s like the old Probability versus Severity matrix 

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