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joepatr

Heave / subsidence from oak on clay soil

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Hi all

 

I’m based in North West London (an area with shrinkable clay subsoil) and currently have an oak tree in my garden, approx 6/7 metres tall. 

 

I’d like to have this taken down eventually but am obviously concerned about the risk of not only subsidence but also heave. 

 

Could anyone recommend the best way to manage this to ensure ensure the safety of my property? I was thinking the best way would be to have the tree slowly reduced over a period of time before having the stump totally removed. 

 

Would this be the way forward, if so, how much and over what period? I was thinking taking it down in quarters over the next few years but one of the local tree surgeons suggested thirds every couple of months. 

 

I’d be grateful for any suggestions and also any companies in the Hillingdon area who could help. 

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......or sell house and move to one without any trees nearby, Barking has some lovely views, K

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It comes  down to "the right tree in the right place"   

 

If the house was built after the tree was growing, you could change that to locating the house (with appropriate  foundations) in the right place. 

 

As others have advised, engage a structural engineer, who will then work with an Arb' Consultant to advise on retention/ remedial pruning  to facilitate retention.

 

If the tree is subject to a TPO or conservation area, the Local Authority will also be involved, if any works are recommended to the tree.  

 

Not sure about when/if you should notify your house insurance company.

 

If it is recommended to fell the tree, then  plant a replacement,  "the right tree in the right place" to ensure your garden / locality retains (at a reduced level) the numerous benefits of a tree.

 

Use an Arborist to advise about a suitable tree.     

 

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Hi there,.

You will not get a comprehensive clear answer to your question on this forum as a full investigation is needed.

You need pay for a report which will need  visits the site  taking measurements, soil samples, liaising with a structural engineer etc.

If you do this, find a company who has done such surveys before, and ask to see a copy of their professional indemnity insurance.

You should find someone on Arbtalk willing to do this. It should be done properly so it will be expensive.

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