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joepatr

Heave / subsidence from oak on clay soil

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Hi all

 

I’m based in North West London (an area with shrinkable clay subsoil) and currently have an oak tree in my garden, approx 6/7 metres tall. 

 

I’d like to have this taken down eventually but am obviously concerned about the risk of not only subsidence but also heave. 

 

Could anyone recommend the best way to manage this to ensure ensure the safety of my property? I was thinking the best way would be to have the tree slowly reduced over a period of time before having the stump totally removed. 

 

Would this be the way forward, if so, how much and over what period? I was thinking taking it down in quarters over the next few years but one of the local tree surgeons suggested thirds every couple of months. 

 

I’d be grateful for any suggestions and also any companies in the Hillingdon area who could help. 

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4 hours ago, Mark2 said:

 

and remember most people giving advice have there own personal agenda ! Good luck 

What agenda do most people on here giving advice have?

Edited by Mick Dempsey

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We are all desperate to drive in to London to get the work Mick.

Can you pick me up on your way through from Dover?

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4 hours ago, tree-fancier123 said:

each big old tree near a house should come with a pipe sticking out the ground with a cap on, and instructions to water x number of litres per day in a hot dry summer

Sod the tree, just water the foundations.

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1 minute ago, tree-fancier123 said:

piss it up against the wall

If that floats your boat.

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I wanted to remove it purely to get light into the garden and also to protect the property.  Whilst there is no rush or risk right now apparent, I don’t want to threaten the property. 
 
I’m sure in the medium term it will also be more cost effective, rather than having to pay someone to come back every few years to maintain it. 



If everyone thought that way we’d have no trees left and unfortunately it’s starting to become a trend. Is not worth trying to keep and maintain the tree? A good reduction every 4/5 years work out to 150ish a year to keep what looks like a glorious tree, and being in London not many of them left!
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We are all desperate to drive in to London to get the work Mick.
Can you pick me up on your way through from Dover?

I can’t imagine a more miserable experience than trying to manhandle that oak tree through the maze like house, up a flight of steps, to find some scrotes nicked the blower and you’ve got a parking ticket.
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On 25 January 2019 at 07:20, Rough Hewn said:

Get the house underpinned.
Keep the tree.
emoji3.pngemoji106.pngemoji106.pngemoji106.png

 

On 24 January 2019 at 21:26, Rough Hewn said:

That trunk would be worth milling if it's not hollow.
emoji106.png

That made me chuckle....  😝

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