Jump to content
Woodworks

"Clean Air Strategy" today we find out.

Recommended Posts

8 hours ago, Alycidon said:

20% is the max limit currently advised by Woodsure,  the firewood arm of Hetas,  stove manufacturers are on paper having to fall in line but talk to their tech people,  they want max 15% or 16%.   Reserch recently has suggested that the optimum MC for minimal emissions is 10%-12%.      All stove will burn 20% wood yes,  but emissions will be higher.  more soot,  slight deposits on the glass etc.  Wack some 5%- 10%  stuff in there and no issues at all.

 

I do NOT belong to Woodsure,  the levels are in my book far to high,  but they are being led by the nose by CW,  the Woodsure fees are so much a ton so they need CW on board to pay their overheads.

 

A

 

At 5% you are into the too dry range and emissions go up again according to Woodsure. As many of us have pointed out countless times all this super dry wood idea is daft as our climate does not allow it to stay super dry as you well know. 

Edited by Woodworks
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We all bring our seasoned wood inside a little at a time and store a few hours to a days worth beside the stove, where it dries a little more.  If I bring wood from the shed at ~18% MC, and sit it ½m from the stove, ambient conditions say 22C and 45% rh, but the ends facing the stove probably reaching 60C, does it dry measurably in 6 hours?  12 hours? 24? 48?  I'm just thinking, how big would my hearth rack need to be in order to achieve 15% MC as it goes to the flames.  I know I used to hear the odd crack from the stored wood drying slightly, although rarely now I'm 2+ years ahead on my wood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, neiln said:

We all bring our seasoned wood inside a little at a time and store a few hours to a days worth beside the stove, where it dries a little more.  If I bring wood from the shed at ~18% MC, and sit it ½m from the stove, ambient conditions say 22C and 45% rh, but the ends facing the stove probably reaching 60C, does it dry measurably in 6 hours?  12 hours? 24? 48?  I'm just thinking, how big would my hearth rack need to be in order to achieve 15% MC as it goes to the flames.  I know I used to hear the odd crack from the stored wood drying slightly, although rarely now I'm 2+ years ahead on my wood.

This might be of interest 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, neiln said:

We all bring our seasoned wood inside a little at a time and store a few hours to a days worth beside the stove, where it dries a little more.  If I bring wood from the shed at ~18% MC, and sit it ½m from the stove, ambient conditions say 22C and 45% rh, but the ends facing the stove probably reaching 60C, does it dry measurably in 6 hours?  12 hours? 24? 48?  I'm just thinking, how big would my hearth rack need to be in order to achieve 15% MC as it goes to the flames.  I know I used to hear the odd crack from the stored wood drying slightly, although rarely now I'm 2+ years ahead on my wood.

I've been replicating a bit of Beau's experiment with a freshly felled piece of ash round 11cms diameter by 24 cms long. My reason being to see if now I have to cut logs shorter could I avoid some splitting work. Graph shows drying adjacent to stove but off the hearth . If the ash was initially 35% mc wwb then it should be about 20% when it reaches 2010 grams, as of today it is 2051 grams. The way the graph is levelling out  its looking near sub 20% already after   nearly two months.

 

Conditions are similar to yours, in the same position a tea bag dries out in 24 hours.

 

So from an itial loss of 56 grams/day it is only losing around 1 gram now.

ashround.jpeg.08f38e3ab1d22aa3082090bece10c104.jpeg

My initial conclusion is that even logs this small should be split.

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20% is the max limit currently advised by Woodsure,  the firewood arm of Hetas,  stove manufacturers are on paper having to fall in line but talk to their tech people,  they want max 15% or 16%.   Reserch recently has suggested that the optimum MC for minimal emissions is 10%-12%.      All stove will burn 20% wood yes,  but emissions will be higher.  more soot,  slight deposits on the glass etc.  Wack some 5%- 10%  stuff in there and no issues at all.
 
I do NOT belong to Woodsure,  the levels are in my book far to high,  but they are being led by the nose by CW,  the Woodsure fees are so much a ton so they need CW on board to pay their overheads.
 
A
 
The fees aren't based on tonnage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 23/01/2019 at 10:27, saintsman54 said:

I work for the National Forest and we’ve transformed 200 square miles of the Midlands through the planting of 8.7 million trees, increasing Forest cover from 6% to more than 20%.

I apologise for the pedantry, but that's only 68 trees per acre, which is about 1/15th of normal stocking density for hardwood. Is there a reason for this? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Statistical extrapolation of the efficiency of Government bodies fat-fingered number crunching, will be to blame.

Or Uncle Joe expressed it differently, apparently.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Big J said:

I apologise for the pedantry, but that's only 68 trees per acre, which is about 1/15th of normal stocking density for hardwood. Is there a reason for this? 

Hi Big J, Sorry I don't think I made it clear in my previous post. The project area is 200 square miles (128000 acres), 25 years ago the woodland cover in the area was at 6% (7680 acres), since then we have increased that to 21% (26880 acres), so we have planted 19200 acres or 5180 hectares.

 

Therefore the average planting density is 453 plants per acre or 1679 plants per hectare. Some areas are parkland, so there will be some a lot lower density and more commercially focused areas with a higher density. 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, neiln said:

We all bring our seasoned wood inside a little at a time and store a few hours to a days worth beside the stove, where it dries a little more.  If I bring wood from the shed at ~18% MC, and sit it ½m from the stove, ambient conditions say 22C and 45% rh, but the ends facing the stove probably reaching 60C, does it dry measurably in 6 hours?  12 hours? 24? 48?  I'm just thinking, how big would my hearth rack need to be in order to achieve 15% MC as it goes to the flames.  I know I used to hear the odd crack from the stored wood drying slightly, although rarely now I'm 2+ years ahead on my wood.

I take logs from my polytunnel and bring them inside for a day or two before burning. This does seem to make a good difference to the dryness, maybe 3 or 4% on my basic moisture meter. (You can also see the cracks in the ends opening up) Having said that, this is by the side of the stove - if I run short, I put them in front of the stove (where they can char from the direct heat! Do this at your own risk, don't leave logs there unattended etc.), and there they seem to dry in an hour or so...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, saintsman54 said:

Hi Big J, Sorry I don't think I made it clear in my previous post. The project area is 200 square miles (128000 acres), 25 years ago the woodland cover in the area was at 6% (7680 acres), since then we have increased that to 21% (26880 acres), so we have planted 19200 acres or 5180 hectares.

 

Therefore the average planting density is 453 plants per acre or 1679 plants per hectare. Some areas are parkland, so there will be some a lot lower density and more commercially focused areas with a higher density. 

Excellent. Thanks for the clarification, and keep up the good work!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Featured Adverts

About

Arbtalk.co.uk is a hub for the arboriculture industry in the UK.  
If you're just starting out and you need business, equipment, tech or training support you're in the right place.  If you've done it, made it, got a van load of oily t-shirts and have decided to give something back by sharing your knowledge or wisdom,  then you're welcome too.
If you would like to contribute to making this industry more effective and safe then welcome.
Just like a living tree, it'll always be a work in progress.
Please have a look around, sign up, share and contribute the best you have.

See you inside.

The Arbtalk Team

Follow us

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.