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Rough Hewn

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Thank you for all this lovely tree totty Mr. Rough - very enjoyable

How quickly do these beautiful colours fade? Days, weeks, months, years?

Or not at all if you use some special unguent?

I have a feeling you're going to say that they all sell the day after you mill them, so you don't know!

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Thank you for all this lovely tree totty Mr. Rough - very enjoyable
How quickly do these beautiful colours fade? Days, weeks, months, years?
Or not at all if you use some special unguent?
I have a feeling you're going to say that they all sell the day after you mill them, so you don't know!

They begin fading within seconds of the cut being opened and exposed to air and draught which drys the surface very quickly.
After a few minutes they will have faded considerably.
However the sapwood goes bright orange!
(Just pour water over and rub in to see the original colour)

After drying and planing and oiling they can be from caramel to peach with pale sapwood.

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2 hours ago, Rough Hewn said:


They begin fading within seconds of the cut being opened and exposed to air and draught which drys the surface very quickly.
After a few minutes they will have faded considerably.
However the sapwood goes bright orange!
(Just pour water over and rub in to see the original colour)emoji6.pngemoji106.png

After drying and planing and oiling they can be from caramel to peach with pale sapwood.
emoji106.png

Herself has just come in from a therapeutic session in the shed turning a bit of spalted birch, and has had the joy of seeing these wonderful unfaded colours. Like a fresh mackerel (well not much like a fresh mackerel in fact but you may get my drift). B60E6619-E364-4D69-9ADE-9FD9F2CB0DA7.thumb.jpeg.2a4430aaaf16a213cd73b0ae3e8cab9a.jpegCE7351A8-AA44-4A90-A422-C2CF2C6B5C41.thumb.jpeg.0131ba997f86d89fee311cd25e66fd66.jpeg

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2 minutes ago, trigger_andy said:

Did you just plop the ladder on the log then slid it along when needed? 

Well it was a little more technical than a plop, but yes, I screwed it down, then moved it along when I got to the end of the first section. These big beeches take a really long ladder. :thumbup1:

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5 minutes ago, AJStrees said:

Well it was a little more technical than a plop, but yes, I screwed it down, then moved it along when I got to the end of the first section. These big beeches take a really long ladder. :thumbup1:

Ah ok. I tried looking and it seemed like there was nothing securing the ladder down. 
 

I’ve a 22’ and 32’ log to do when I get home. I planned on using 2-3 ladder sections and getting them all packed out and level with my 2.4m spirit level. Also considered doing them but by bit with one ladder section but thought it would be tricky to keep the straight line. 

Edited by trigger_andy
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4 minutes ago, trigger_andy said:

Ah ok. I tried looking and it seemed like there was nothing securing the ladder down. 
 

I’ve a 22’ and 32’ log to do when I get home. I planned on using 2-3 ladder sections and getting them all packed out and level with my 2.4m spirit level. Also considered doing them but by bit with one ladder section but thought it would be tricky to keep the straight line. 

I can't say if the way I am doing it is the best method to be fair. But it seems to work alright and having done a few chunky monsters recently this way, it has seemed to work fine. Did some 16 foot long beech recently, this one is about 14 foot, though I still need to measure the length exactly. 

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I can't say if the way I am doing it is the best method to be fair. But it seems to work alright and having done a few chunky monsters recently this way, it has seemed to work fine. Did some 16 foot long beech recently, this one is about 14 foot, though I still need to measure the length exactly. 

Life’s short.
Get a bigger ladder.
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