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Entrenched Ivy on Mature ASH removal

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I think this a simple 30 min job. Step ladder, silky, pry bar, & loppers, cut all ivy round trunk, just leave rest above & it will drop

off on its own eventually  or am a missing something?

 

Try this first & if it all doesn't die  then so what though probably 90% will, & you can always go back to the tree again etc if some rogue piece has rooted in a hollow & stays alive or just leave that....

 

 

Or if you want to make big job out of it spend ages removing it all......

 

Beware ivy dust can be is nasty/itchy or maybe thats just me ....

 

 

 

 

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35 minutes ago, Mark Bolam said:

If you sever a ring above the buttresses the ivy should 'release' a little after a few weeks to make removal easier.

SRT will make climbing a lot easier.

 

 

Removing ivy from a tree is very much like making love to a beautiful woman.

 

It starts gently and carefully as you pick away at the top, fingers darting away at delicate soft yielding tendrils, then, as you descend, the excitement rises bigger pieces fall away and before you know it, you reach the trunk, huge sheets fall away in a highly satisfying fashion, you realise you’re reaching the end and shout sexual abuse at the ivy, kicking and thrashing to finish the job.

Afterwards you stand there completely spent, tired, filthy but sated.

Edited by Mick Dempsey
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So the consensus is no chemicals, hand removal, it will benefit the trees structure and livelyhood.

Got it.

Cheers, folks.

 

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20 hours ago, Mick Dempsey said:

So, the benefits of ancient and veteran ivy? What are they? And (assuming they exist and are quantifiable) how do they outweigh the wellbeing of a tree like that?

 

(May sound passive aggressive but looking to learn)

great age, and size for the species, condition, biodiversity value as a result of significant wood decay and the habitat created from the ageing process. Same as for trees.

 

Management is about balances, or at least enlightened management is. What is the tree being managed for. What's important about the tree, what biological associations does it have and how will they be affected by the removal of the ivy. E.g. ivy can shade out rare lichens and it would be beneficial to manage it. But removing ivy can physically damage the lichens you are trying to maintain, and will also open up the lichen to increased sunlight, which might damage it.

 

David Lonsdale in Ancient and Other Veteran Trees: further guidance on management, states that 'Old ivy stems should not be pulled from the stems of veteran trees, except under advice from a lichen specialist'. And advises, amongst other things, '[the] avoidance of major changes in cover by ivy, other trees or undergrowth, which would greatly alter the incidence of sunshine (and hence the micro-climate) on tree surfaces'. And '...the retention of ivy and the protection of trees by fencing have an important place in conservation management'. And, 'Any decision to control ivy should be made in the light of an assessment of its benefits for various forms of wildlife against its possible adverse effects...'

 

To start with you need to understand the tree, and then you can come up with a management plan, which would take into account the ivy and it's benefits. and how that fits into the plan.

 

Or you could just rip it all off, as advised in this thread, without any investigation of the tree, proper management plan, understanding of the harm that could arise, thought or consideration of its benefits. 

 

It's all about balancing competing objectives. And for that you need to understand the whole, not just one little bit.

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Why not compromise then?

De-ivy the canopy and leave the entrenched ivy on the main stem.

No wind loading issues then, some habitat is maintained, the bees are happy, and you only have to deal with smaller diameter stuff which is easier to pull off.

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So, rare lichens, possibly.
 
Also sunscorch....in Waterford.
 
 
 
 
Last year? Yeah, Very real possibility. This year? Who knows? It does occasionally shine on this otherwise grey and foggy isle. . . Sometimes.

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43 minutes ago, Mark Bolam said:

Why not compromise then?

De-ivy the canopy and leave the entrenched ivy on the main stem.

No wind loading issues then, some habitat is maintained, the bees are happy, and you only have to deal with smaller diameter stuff which is easier to pull off.

Compromise by all means, but you need to understand what it is that you are weighing in the scales. Nobody does because there has been no detailed investigation of the tree and what, if anything, is special about it, which would advise the management plan for the tree and all it's associated biodiversity.

 

Reducing weight and windloading may be one priority. Maintaining a micro-climate on the trunk and branches may be another, getting more light to the trunk may be another, another may be providing food for bees and other insects, and yet another providing a place for pigeons to nest.

 

Only once you understand the priorities can you decide what is the best way to manage the tree. And here we come full circle because there has been no assessment of the tree and it's associations to identify the priorities in order to inform a considered management strategy.

Edited by EdwardC

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The priority is the continued existence of the tree, not bees, pigeons or lichen.

 

That is the only thing in the scales.

 

(see post no1 in the thread)

Edited by Mick Dempsey

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