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Entrenched Ivy on Mature ASH removal

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1 minute ago, Mick Dempsey said:

Vespa means wasp in Italian, which is kind of relevant.

Almost poetic ! ūüėÄ

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On 08/01/2019 at 20:45, Mick Dempsey said:

Load of nonsense, plenty of ivy everywhere, if the trees worth keeping, take it off or cut it at the base.

 

On 08/01/2019 at 20:34, Mick Dempsey said:

Of course veteran trees shouldn‚Äôt be felled just because of cavities etc. Concrete or even expanding foam can be used toÔĽŅ good effect to help the tree remain standingÔĽŅ.

I appreciate the tongue in cheek element of part of the second quote. However, there are a few problems. Firstly; not only is there plenty of ivy, there are plenty of trees. But not all are ancient or veteran with all the benefits. The benefits of ancient and veteran trees are recognised, but as yet the same benefits of ancient and veteran ivy etc isn't.

 

As Connor says, there has to be a balance, a balance we're happy to strike in respect of trees. But that balance is missing along with the good management of ivy etc. and it's so much more than just bees.

Edited by EdwardC

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1 minute ago, EdwardC said:

 

I appreciate the tongue in cheek element of part of the second quote. However, there are a few problems. Firstly; not only is there plenty of ivy, there are plenty of trees. But not all are ancient or veteran with all the benefits. The benefits of ancient and veteran trees are recognised, but as yet the same benefits of ancient and veteran ivy etc isn't.

 

As Connor says, there has to be a balance. But that balance is missing along with good management, and it's so much more than just bees.

So, the benefits of ancient and veteran ivy? What are they? And (assuming they exist and are quantifiable) how do they outweigh the wellbeing of a tree like that?

 

(May sound passive aggressive but looking to learn)

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41 minutes ago, Mick Dempsey said:

So, the benefits of ancient and veteran ivy? What are they? And (assuming they exist and are quantifiable) how do they outweigh the wellbeing of a tree like that?

 

(May sound passive aggressive but looking to learn)

Not necessarily ancient or veteran ivy, but it has for centuries been recognised as a natural anti inflammatory, (saponins found in some hedera helix have been noted to react with histamines to reduce swelling) research has and still is being conducted on its properties for reducing inflammation for arthritis, it is a source of autumn and winter pollen as previously mentioned, you can make a tea direct from its leaves which eases mucous expulsion for asthmatics and copd sufferers. it provides a shelter for many species of bird and insect, (important when many overly trimmed hedgerows do not.)not all of which are beneficial directly to us as humans but we are not the only things on this planet.

Regarding the tree, at this stage the ivy may be so deeply connected to the tree that it's complete and instant removal may shock it. I am not a qualified arb so cannot stand over this remark, feel free to correct me if I am wrong but I would imagine both organisms have been living side by side for quite some time and the immediate removal of the ivy may possibly interfere with the trees growth pattern, e.g. sudden increase in growth adding weight to already weakened branches?change of water content in soil due to the ivy no longer drawing up any could cause root rot or destabilization in wet conditions? Also the potential to cause physical damage to an already stressed tree whilst removing the ivy( no reflection on whoever is doing it, just putting it there as a possibility..probability if a chainsaw wielding farmer goes at it) I'm sure there's more but I'm sick of typing. If you need references I will provide them but I'd rather you just went and had a look yourself, you obviously have the internet. I've had a long day and I'm going for a footbath and a beer.

Edited by Conor Wright
Footbath not footpath.

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We've plenty of ivy on the estate. There's no shortage of ivy in Ireland, far as I can tell. My main concern is the health of this tree. I have been removing ivy from it piece by piece over the last couple of years(it's large even by PNW standards), so it's unlikely going to be shocked. I was mainly wondering if there was a chemical means safe for the tree that would slow the growth of the ivy so I could attack the crowning ivy without having to put a climber in to what could be a rather unsafe situation, and risk less damage to the bark with forcible removal.

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If you sever a ring above the buttresses the ivy should 'release' a little after a few weeks to make removal easier.

SRT will make climbing a lot easier.

 

I have known ivy to take such a hold that even with a 2' wide ring severed it remains completely alive, somehow rooting into the tree.

I would definitely try and remove at least most of it for the benefit of the tree, but carefully.

 

Good luck, and let us know the outcome.

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5 minutes ago, Mark Bolam said:

If you sever a ring above the buttresses the ivy should 'release' a little after a few weeks to make removal easier.

SRT will make climbing a lot easier.

 

I have known ivy to take such a hold that even with a 2' wide ring severed it remains completely alive, somehow rooting into the tree.

I would definitely try and remove at least most of it for the benefit of the tree, but carefully.

 

Good luck, and let us know the outcome.

 

This situation is more like your second statement than the first. It's thick and it's been in the tree decades. Symbiotic at this point.

The tree is in a plane that perennially floods since it is not far off the river Suir. So, any structural damage will be tested on a yearly basis. I would hate to remove the ivy only to find the tree collapsed the next flood.

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9 minutes ago, wyk said:

 

This situation is more like your second statement than the first. It's thick and it's been in the tree decades. Symbiotic at this point.

The tree is in a plane that perennially floods since it is not far off the river Suir. So, any structural damage will be tested on a yearly basis. I would hate to remove the ivy only to find the tree collapsed the next flood.

Symbiotic? Which of the three types would you say this represents?

 

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Edited by Mick Dempsey

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2 hours ago, wyk said:

I was mainly wondering if there was a chemical means safe for the tree that would slow the growth of the ivy

Given that I think ecoplugs are  an expensive  form of litter I'd hesitate to  recommend their use but...

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